Do cars last longer? - Page 2 - Vintage Mustang Forums

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post #16 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-02-2017, 11:42 PM Thread Starter
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Many people under 40 have had no reason to look under the hood of their car. By 1990 most cars had EFI so if they had a 90 or newer they missed the joy of dealing with carburetor automatic choke and other carb adjustments. Distributor points, vacuum advance etc. were gone. It was turn the engine (motor) on summer or winter.

If presented with a like new restored vintage 65-75 car very likely there would be a big and lengthy learning curve. Remember I'm talking regular non car hobby people!

Many people under 40 have never had a car without power windows. "What's the funny crank on the door?"

Some of my friends are retired engineers and have never looked under the hood of their 3 or 4 year old car don't know if it's a V6 or 4, pretty sure it's not a V8, V8s are getting to be obsolete!

One thing the 40 and under every day driver know is how to put gas in the car and where the credit card goes on the pump! 50 years ago many people didn't know where the gas went in their car.


My '64 1/2 vert. Ordered May '64. D code 4 speed, handling package, caspian blue, accent group, Ford blue manual top.

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post #17 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 01:07 AM
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New cars definitely do last a lot longer - both body and mileage, though of course much more so mileage.

My '94 Camry has 245,000 miles on the clock and has only ever needed a thermostat beyond normal maintenance (timing belt / oil / plugs). It runs just as well now as it did when I was 3 years old, and has aged remarkably well with no wear on the interior and still pretty excellent paint (though the hood has lost a lot of its paint off the front, which is a known problem for those years related to aerodynamics). Still gets 25 mpg. It will keep on ticking for many years to come, I'm sure.

Now Jane I mess with on a regular basis. Sometimes I'm just puttering, and sometimes I'm doing actual maintenance (mostly just puttering, to be frank). But the motor certainly does need more tuneup and fiddly bits. And if it makes it to 200k before I pull it for another rebuild I'd be amazed. I'll probably have 100k on it in the next 8ish years, so we'll see how it's doing then. By that point I'll also need new suspension and probably some other items. But I don't expect a car that's using half-century-old technology to need less work than the new ones.

The important thing is that my car always seems to "last" for exactly as long as I need her to, and then does silly things once I get to home base. So that's good enough for me


Calamity Jane 1966 Modified Fastback - Driven semi-daily!
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post #18 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 02:51 AM
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One thing the 40 and under every day driver know is how to put gas in the car and where the credit card goes on the pump! 50 years ago many people didn't know where the gas went in their car.
Ironically, dealing with the stupid fill neck is probably the most challenging part of actually driving these old cars.
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post #19 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 07:49 AM
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Quote:
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Many people under 40 have had no reason to look under the hood of their car. By 1990 most cars had EFI so if they had a 90 or newer they missed the joy of dealing with carburetor automatic choke and other carb adjustments. Distributor points, vacuum advance etc. were gone. It was turn the engine (motor) on summer or winter.
Great point. I'm astounded by how little my son's and their friends know about cars these days, but I really shouldn't be. Cars are far more complicated, but they're far more reliable. Other than an unforeseen part failure, the hoods on cars stay down for the most part nowadays.

As with the the old Aerostar I mentioned in my previous post, cars today just don't need to be fiddled with as much. That old high mileage Aerostar that hadn't been run in over two years started immediately with just a two second crank and idled and ran like it was run minutes before. Didn't struggle to life, didn't smoke, didn't shake, didn't repeatedly stall, didn't stumble or surge under way. Again, there's nothing extraordinary about this example. Just wasn't like that with old cars.

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post #20 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 08:39 AM Thread Starter
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Great point. I'm astounded by how little my son's and their friends know about cars these days, but I really shouldn't be. Cars are far more complicated, but they're far more reliable. Other than an unforeseen part failure, the hoods on cars stay down for the most part nowadays.

As with the the old Aerostar I mentioned in my previous post, cars today just don't need to be fiddled with as much. That old high mileage Aerostar that hadn't been run in over two years started immediately with just a two second crank and idled and ran like it was run minutes before. Didn't struggle to life, didn't smoke, didn't shake, didn't repeatedly stall, didn't stumble or surge under way. Again, there's nothing extraordinary about this example. Just wasn't like that with old cars.

John

Our 97 Towne and Country sits outside (this is Wisconsin) waiting for occasional hauling or moving a large item or items. Sometimes it has sat for a month, sometimes 2, has snow piled 6" or more over it. Clear it off and it fires up like it was used yesterday!

Gotta add it has the big Chrysler regular OHV v6. We had an 88 Voyager that had the Mitsu OHC v6. That engine was shot at about 90,000 we did an exchange with a rebuilt.

For historic purposes. Back in 66 I ran into a "barn find" 37 Ford business (2 pass) coupe. Little old lady was selling, bought it new, her only car all service do at the nearby Ford dealer. The wool seat had seatcover when new, had second layer when first wore. The factory seat literally had never been sat on directly! It was a close to new
37 coupe. I HAD to buy it! 54,000 ran like new but burned oil lioke crazy! Young (under 60) people today seem to
think using a quart in a 1000 miles indicates engine is shot! That low mileage 37 didn't leak engine or trans oil. The engine (85 hp flathead V8) burned a quart per 50 miles! 40 wt abd a can of STP and an easy gas pedal foot I could make 100 mile/qt! The original owners had a space in the back to fill in replacement Ford engine and new serial number. The new car came with info on engine exchange.

Enough blah blah, I didn't make this up this is how it was!!


My '64 1/2 vert. Ordered May '64. D code 4 speed, handling package, caspian blue, accent group, Ford blue manual top.

'68 vert. driver. Owned since Apr '78. C code AT, AC, PS, P disc B, PT lime gold, standard black interior and top. NOS RF fender and left quarter.New top and folding glass.
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post #21 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 04:39 PM
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My wife's car is an 07 Yukon with 215K. Single owner, non smoker, garage kept, it's a Total cream puff.

I could easily set the odometer back to read 50 - 75K and no one would be the wiser. It's all in the way your maintain them.

Wife,........."You drove how far for that thing?"
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post #22 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 05:46 PM
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Quote:
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Ironically, dealing with the stupid fill neck is probably the most challenging part of actually driving these old cars.
aaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrggggggggggg! every single time
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post #23 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 06:01 PM
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aaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrggggggggggg! every single time
Am I the only person here who has never had a problem filling the tank up?? Except for one time, when the pump shutoff valve was apparently broken and I pumped an extra 3 gallons out of the tank onto the ground... lol.


Calamity Jane 1966 Modified Fastback - Driven semi-daily!
Wrecked and rebuilt even better
289 v8, 4-speed, 3.25 9" rear, goodies and stuff.

See my travel blog here for my adventures: http://calamityjaneroadtrip.blogspot.com/
2014: 10,051 mile, 2-month-long road trip around America
2015: 3,000 mile trip to Knotts in CA, CO to East Coast, an engine rebuild or two
2016: East Coast to TX, Hot August Nights, more trips to the East Coast
2017: Several long trips in the works! Stay tuned
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post #24 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 06:48 PM
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PCV was one of the best things to add miles to an engine. When they had road draft tube they ended up as sludge buckets. Also better oil, remember the oil they use to sell in service stations in glass bottles, I thing it was recycled!

Larry


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post #25 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 08:21 PM
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aaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrggggggggggg! every single time
Since I painted my car, I just cram a towel between the trunk panel and the bumper. I refuse to be one of those chumps with peeling paint directly underneath the filler!

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Am I the only person here who has never had a problem filling the tank up?? Except for one time, when the pump shutoff valve was apparently broken and I pumped an extra 3 gallons out of the tank onto the ground... lol.
I'm going to blame it on the concave taillight panel on '67s and '68s. Part of the rubber handle touches my bumper whenever I fill up limiting how straight I can keep the nozzle. You have a little more wiggle room with your inferior flat taillight panels.

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post #26 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-03-2017, 08:30 PM
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I have a foolproof method when I fuel up. I have 2 bath towels, one gets tucked between the bumper-body and the other gets draped under the pop open cap and up over the open trunk lip. Pump on med speed and don't spill any fuel.

If I forgo the towels guarantee it will spill

Larry

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post #27 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-04-2017, 08:43 AM
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Think about how the cars were equipped. For example, tool kits, dual spare tires, etc.

In the 1920's, Chevrolet recommended carrying a spare REAR AXLE for trips over 500 miles.

IIRC, the warranty on the Mustang K motor was 3 months or 4K miles instead of the standard 12K or 12 months.

Could you imagine trying to sell a car today with a 12/12 warranty?

Tires, Wiper Blades, Filters, Gas, Oil, Wiper Fluid.

That is about all the average 1st owner of a car, who at least somewhat follows the recommended servicing, will need to do for the 1st 100K.

I bought my mom a new Mercedes. It does not even have an oil dip stick. The computer monitors everything.

Except for me, cars are just a large appliance in our home. They are bought new, used for a period of time, and then replaced before they become problematic. My daughter is a traveling nurse. She works 3 months at a time as a pediatric emergency room nurse, all over the country. She often works at night, and drives at 3:00 am in relatively unfamiliar areas back to her apartment. Reliability is a MUST for her car, including run flat tires. It has to start every time, and not break down, as she does not have a circle of support in the places she goes.

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post #28 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-04-2017, 09:12 AM
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Am I the only person here who has never had a problem filling the tank up?? Except for one time, when the pump shutoff valve was apparently broken and I pumped an extra 3 gallons out of the tank onto the ground... lol.
For me the hardest part is always getting the stupid gas cap back on. It's embarassing because I have to crouch down next to it, and kind of tilt my head to look at it to make sure I'm getting it on squarely, and it looks like the first time I've ever put gas in the car (which is that IS what I did the first time I ever put gas in the car too )


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post #29 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-04-2017, 12:59 PM Thread Starter
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Wah, wah, wah!

So we have a car we spent/spend a zillion hours making it look great and a zillion more on mechanical projects.
Now it off for a cruise or the longed for drive to show it off. Stop at the gas station and you may have to watch/tend
for 2 minutes while you put gas in. Damn! @$+&*%

When I was senior high school I worked at a Standard actual service station. On Sundays and Holidays I often opened up and took care of the 6 gas pumps along with grease and oil jobs and car washes. We washed the windshield, volunteered to check oil and battery and tire air.

Many cars like the 57 Chev and 56 Cad had gas fill under pop up tail light, difficult to get it to take gas slowly while holding the nozzle. They would be just the one "fill it and check the oil and tires! Meaniwile 4 others getting gas and waiting! By the way back then customers were not allowed to pump gas into their car. I wasn't complaining, happy to have the job that was paying for my old Ford @ $1/hr.

Last edited by slim; 03-04-2017 at 01:02 PM.
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post #30 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-04-2017, 01:35 PM
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My daughters 2004 V6 Mustang has 250k with only maintenence and one clutch change.

My 2012 140k Dodge Caliber only has maintenence and a rear wheel bearing change ~ $50.

My dads 1965 Vista Cruiser had to valve jobs before 100k. My moms 1967 Mustang had a valve job right at 100k.

In the 60s high performance was defined at 1hp per ci. That was a mechanical cam, high compression and premium fuel.

My wifes 2014 3.7 V6 is ~226 ci and it is rated at 310 hp on regular fuel.

Weve come a long way baby!



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