Do cars last longer? - Page 3 - Vintage Mustang Forums

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post #31 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-04-2017, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by bmcgc View Post

My wifes 2014 3.7 V6 is ~226 ci and it is rated at 310 hp on regular fuel.
Getting off topic, but that is a *terrific* engine that has proven to be almost bullet proof. Low 14s stock and high 13s with an exhaust and tune, plus 30 MPG on the highway and silky smooth. How many early Mustangs came close to those performance numbers with much more displacement?

Back to topic, my wife's Edge has the smaller version of your Cyclone and at 85K miles has only needed oil changes. I'll probably put plugs in it when the weather warms up. Even the plugs last almost forever in new cars these days.

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post #32 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-04-2017, 04:25 PM
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My wifes 2014 3.7 V6 is ~226 ci and it is rated at 310 hp on regular fuel.

My 2016 Fiesta ST has a 97 cu motor that puts out 200 hp!

That's just nuts.

-Mark-

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"Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy a race car. And I've never been sad in a race car!"

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post #33 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-05-2017, 02:23 AM
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Last longer? Hell no! The newer cars obviously get more miles racked up than the older ones, but they're disposable pop cans for the most part. They rust away or fall apart after 10 years and get scrapped for the most part. Back in the day you'd see cars all the time with mis-matched fenders, doors, hoods, etc. People had wrecked them, then went and got junkyard parts to keep going and looking 'decent' enough to drive. Now a day they're not typically worth spending the money to repair damaged parts- they just get driven until the wheels fall off. When was the last time you saw a mid 2000's F150 with cab corners? Or an Avalanche, or Chebby truck with rockers? How about a Dodge truck with fenders?? A Ford Taurus with ANYTHING still left behind the rocker plasctic is a miracle! Sure the older ones rusted too, but not nearly as fast or as bad as the new stuff does. So last longer you ask.... nope.
First off, let me say that I have no bias here I like my new vehicles ok but I love my classic Ford cars. But to say that the newer modern cars don't last longer is simply ridiculous. Just look at the huge advancements in rust protection. Almost all new car chassis today go thru a multi-step electro-coat primer process before finish paint. This process literally dips the entire welded chassis in multiple baths with the e-coat bath as the final step. This process cleans, degreases, conditions and phosphate coats the ENTIRE chassis before the final e-coat bath. This E-coating process gets primer into every nook and cranny so that NO surface is left unprotected. Also since it is electrically deposited the primer thickness is extremely uniform everywhere.

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post #34 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-05-2017, 09:46 AM
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First off, let me say that I have no bias here I like my new vehicles ok but I love my classic Ford cars. But to say that the newer modern cars don't last longer is simply ridiculous. Just look at the huge advancements in rust protection. Almost all new car chassis today go thru a multi-step electro-coat primer process before finish paint. This process literally dips the entire welded chassis in multiple baths with the e-coat bath as the final step. This process cleans, degreases, conditions and phosphate coats the ENTIRE chassis before the final e-coat bath. This E-coating process gets primer into every nook and cranny so that NO surface is left unprotected. Also since it is electrically deposited the primer thickness is extremely uniform everywhere.
In general I agree, but in some cases, experience has proven otherwise. Certain make/models must not be performing these steps properly, because some areas rust like a 60's car.
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post #35 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-05-2017, 12:37 PM Thread Starter
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If you go back to 1900 historically. Read, Google , etc. autos and trucks had step by step evolution.

Very early ones were fairly simple horseless carriages. Auto builders tried gasoline, steam and electric. There were little or no paved roads or gas/service stations. The Model T, Henry's low priced mass produced car put millions on the road (as they were) in the 20s. By the 40s cars were getting rounded, more streamlined bur still had bolt on fenders on a simple body bolted on a frame.

The 50s (late 40s) began radical styling. Flowing fenders, welded on quarter panels and lots of hidden areas. Manufacturing developed methods for extreme metal stamping of the radical new sheet metal. Cars no longer had rounded bolt on fenders.

Compare 48 autos with 57-59. On and on.

By the 50s we had complicated car body designs on roads in the rust belt that was making wide use of road salt to eliminate the inconvenience of chains. Great for winter travel but those nice new 50s cars were rusting out in just a few years.

This would be an interesting research paper:

How long did cars lost over the years. When they were junked why?


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post #36 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-05-2017, 03:58 PM
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Many people under 40 have had no reason to look under the hood of their car. By 1990 most cars had EFI so if they had a 90 or newer they missed the joy of dealing with carburetor automatic choke and other carb adjustments. Distributor points, vacuum advance etc. were gone. It was turn the engine (motor) on summer or winter.

If presented with a like new restored vintage 65-75 car very likely there would be a big and lengthy learning curve. Remember I'm talking regular non car hobby people!

Many people under 40 have never had a car without power windows. "What's the funny crank on the door?"
If presented with a vintage car most people under 40 would promptly sell it. Particularly anything with a manual transmission.
Even the best appointed car in that timeframe is stark and barren compared to what is considered "basic" car trim now-a-days.

Window crank- So I'm working for GM and the year is 1998. One of my fellow ACDelco co-workers shows me the latest "program"
car he's been issued (all field sales people had cars issued to them). It was a 1998 Chevy Cavalier. He opens the door and asks me
what I see that's unusual. We didn't even realize we could get cars with manual windows. His last company car had been a
Cadillac De Ville and I believe mine at that time was a Olds Cutless Supreme. No manual windows on those cars and not an option.

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post #37 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-19-2017, 05:38 PM
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I bought my mom a new Mercedes. It does not even have an oil dip stick. The computer monitors everything.
My parents have a new Mercedes as well. It is an awesome piece of machinery! I often wonder if Mercedes will be the first car maker that seals their hoods (or make a computer coded key will open the hood) so you have to take it into the dealership to get anything worked on.
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post #38 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-20-2017, 10:28 PM
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I would ask, are the cars of the 1980's, 1990's, and 2000's affordable for someone to keep on the road ? They may las longer, but only if price is no object. Last time I looked, my garage doesn't resemble Jay Leno's.

Ask anyone that has tried to restore a 300ZX twin turbo if it can restored without going way upsidedown. It can't be done. The electronics of the 1980's to 2000's are getting very expensive to maintain and replace. And that's if you can even find the parts. In comparison the cars of the 1950's and 1960's are sI pale to work on and parts are affordable.


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post #39 of 39 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 06:33 AM
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My auntie and uncle who lives in Canada just over the border from Maine have a 15 year old family saloon car which is either a Honda or a Toyota, I cant remember exactly. He is not a car person and just has the yearly servicing done on it at a garage and he never does anything himself or even opens the hood.

I was visiting relatives in Maine a year ago, so I popped over the border to see them. This car still looks in excellent condition and the rear wheel arches are only just starting to bubble with some very small rust blisters. In the UK it is quite normal to see 10 - 15 year old cars that still look immaculate and not showing any signs of visible rust. But our winters are nowhere near as bad.

When I was young I would go to scrap yards with my father in the late 1970's and early 1980's and most cars in there were basically completely rusted out. Underneath and on top. The engines were probably still usable. Now when I go to scrap yards, the cars in there are either written off from an accident, or they look immaculate and the engine has expired. It seems a shame to see cars going into the crusher and the bodywork is still more or less rust free. It is just uneconomical to get the blown engine replaced and people just scrap them.

Cars here in the 1950's and 1960's had practically zero rust prevention on them. New cars are exempt from our yearly inspection for the first 3 years and then every year after that. It was quite normal for a car to fail its first inspection when only 3 years old from some sort of structural rust in the floor or chassis legs. Our winters were a lot harsher than they are now, but even so, that is pretty poor. Back then Jaguars, Vauxhalls, Rovers, just rusted in not time. And even worse was Lancia's, Alfa Romoe's and Fiat's. If you starred at them long enough, you could probably see rust appearing before your eyes. Now All these cars last very well. All car manufacturers have had to up their game. Even Italian cars now can reach 10 plus years old with no visible rust.

The only old cars that really survive now are the ones that have been pampered and looked after, or some sort of barn find and it just happened to be in a dry damp free environment.

My father sold a 1960's Jaguar in the early 1980's. The bodywork on the outside and the interior was in really good condition. But underneath it was completely rusted through in structural areas. He sold it for next to nothing. He thinks the buyers were going to restore it, but I think they were just buying cars for banger racing.

The failures I seem to see now on modern cars seem to be things like fuel pumps, injectors, sensors, ball joints, rubber suspension bushes and snapped cam belts if they were not replaced at the correct intervals.
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