Nitrogen Filled Tires - Page 3 - Vintage Mustang Forums
Vintage Mustang Forum
HomeForumGalleryClassifiedsAbout UsAdvertiseContact Us
» Auto Insurance
» Featured Product
Go Back   Vintage Mustang Forums > General Discussion > General Discussion (Non-Vintage Mustang)
Vintage-Mustang.com is the premier Ford Mustang Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-31-2012, 02:35 PM   #31 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
aolshove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 2,148
Default

I just leased a new Honda Civic and one of the $40 options was Nitrogen. The dealer claimed it was to allow the the tire pressure monitoring system to be more accurate. I just chose to go with regular old air.
__________________
'68 convertible restoration "almost done". See Ol' Rusty's progress at 68Vert.BlogSpot.Com

MCA #72655
aolshove is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-31-2012, 05:36 PM   #32 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 13
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GT289 View Post
Ever seen the fitting that fills tractor tires 100% with water? Same concept to
fill with nitrogen.
Ever seen a million bucks cash? Just because you haven't, doesn't mean it
doesn't exist.
Pressure stability in a tire is a benefit of nitrogen.... just because it isn't an
important benefit to everyone doesn't mean it's bogus.....
Not sure if you are serious or sarcastic, but in case serious and for the benefit of others...

When you fill a tractor tire with water the water displces the air and you continue to add water until it comes out the top stem thus having displaced all the air.

When you inject pure N2 into a tire since i is a gas it simply mixes with the atomspheric air and makes a different mixture of mixed gas. In theory the longer you purge pure n2 in the more impurities oud get out. I think when this was tested at the Clemoson Univeristy International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR) it was determined that you could functionally get all the non N2 particles out by continually injecting N2 for around 45 minutes...

I parked my 65 coupe for the past 5 years after my best friend passed away as he and I had been working on it together and every time I touched it brought back too many memories. I am finally ready to get back on it, and found this thread yesterday, I am really sorry that my first three posts have been on this goofy subject.
SC Stangger is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 05:37 PM   #33 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 13
Default

final statement, btw the N2 is better for TPMS as it is true dry air and you dont have the moisture freeze damage to the small PCB transmitter.
SC Stangger is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-31-2012, 07:51 PM   #34 (permalink)
Supporting Member
Just some guy
 
GypsyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: SC foothills, USA
Posts: 12,205
Default

Err, in my case there were no transmitters. Tire pressure is inferred through the ABS sensors by variations in rotating speeds of individual wheels. FWD cars heavily load and work primarily the front tires hence they run hotter than the rears. With air in the tires the TPMS was constantly fooled into thinking the rear tires were low after a certain travel distance because the front tires expanded more and increased measureably in diameter by comparison. When the air was exchanged for nitrogen the problem went away. Whether or not the theories and textbooks agree, it worked. I suspect the problem may have been aggravated by the low end quality of the tires also.
GypsyR is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2013, 11:07 AM   #35 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Houston Heights, Texas
Posts: 556
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 66kcoupe View Post
I think road material affects wear more than anything. When I lived in NJ my tires would last at least to warranty life or more on mostly asphalt roads, since I"ve moved to Texas my tires have barely reached half of the warranty life (makes for cheap tire replacement under warranty, lol) Pavement is all concrete down here.
Don't blame Texas for your driving style! My factory Goodyear Wranglers on my truck made it over 50,000 miles driving all over Texas and to several other states in 4 years.

Constant air pressure, driving style, wear rating, stop and go driving, jack rabbit starts, hard braking all affect tire life as well as vehicle suspension. I've seen strut based cars wear tires more adversely than vehicles with typical SLA suspension.

Y.M.M.V.
HoustonGlock is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2013, 11:51 AM   #36 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
My427stang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Papillion, NE
Posts: 1,976
Send a message via AIM to My427stang
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SC Stangger View Post
final statement, btw the N2 is better for TPMS as it is true dry air and you dont have the moisture freeze damage to the small PCB transmitter.
This is the most logical explanation I have heard

When you think about how many shops don't drain their compressor, or the home use guy that is working his baby Craftsman compressor hard in a humid environment, it make perfect sense.

It's not the presence of Nitrogen, the benefit would be the absence of water.

With that being said, compressed gasses come in grades too, how pure is the Nitrogen the tires shops buy? I am sure its better than the changing ambient air, but it is surely not hospital grade kind of pure either.
__________________
http://i528.photobucket.com/albums/d...ndarShots2.jpg
70 Sportsroof, 427 FE, 489 cid, 10.7:1, Erson valvetrain, KC ported Edelbrock heads, modified Massflo EFI, TKO-600, 31 spline 4.10, A/C.
71 F100 4x4 shortbed 445 FE, ported iron heads, ported RPM intake, Bullet custom solids, 1000 Holley
13 Ram 2500 Laramie Quad Cab 6.7 diesel
My427stang is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2013, 04:51 PM   #37 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 13
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GypsyR View Post
Err, in my case there were no transmitters. Tire pressure is inferred through the ABS sensors by variations in rotating speeds of individual wheels. FWD cars heavily load and work primarily the front tires hence they run hotter than the rears. With air in the tires the TPMS was constantly fooled into thinking the rear tires were low after a certain travel distance because the front tires expanded more and increased measureably in diameter by comparison. When the air was exchanged for nitrogen the problem went away. Whether or not the theories and textbooks agree, it worked. I suspect the problem may have been aggravated by the low end quality of the tires also.
Curious what vehicle you are working with.
TPMS are required by NHTSA and if I am not mistaken they stipulate a pressure valve located inside the rim. I will have to dig the law up when I am not on a mobile to be 100%.

Now it is possible you had some "older" vehicle where it was an optional "luxury" feature.., but as far as I know every new car sold in the US has to use the valve stem pressure monitors.
SC Stangger is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2013, 09:22 PM   #38 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
70_Cougar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 2,076
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by silverblueBP View Post
*Warning* make sure to extinguish all ignition sources before cracking the valve on the nitrogen bottle. You don't want to end up like the Hindenburg.
At least Bob would wait for April 1st
70_Cougar is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2013, 11:30 PM   #39 (permalink)
Supporting Member
Just some guy
 
GypsyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: SC foothills, USA
Posts: 12,205
Default

Last I heard both TPMS and iTPMS (roll-radius sensing) met the requirements of the "Tread" law. But keeping up with such stuff surely isn't my area of interest.
Vehicle in question was a FWD Buick Rendezvous and that's about all I recall about it. AFAIK nitrogen isn't/wasn't ever specified by GM for that vehicle. Nitrogen is just what I used to solve a problem I suspect of being caused by the combination of an overly sensitive TPMS and/or crappy tires. A buddy at the Buick dealership said they had run into the same problem and fixed it with a different brand of tire.
There are benefits to using nitrogen. Period. Now whether it's worth our individual time and trouble for any certain car is highly debatable. For what it's worth, I don't personally use it and have no real interest in bothering with it for my personal vehicles.
GypsyR is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2013, 01:27 AM   #40 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
bartl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: West Rutland, Vermont, USA
Posts: 14,974
Default

I'd rather fill all mine with Helium to make the car lighter and get better gas mileage....
__________________
http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/signaturepics/sigpic19079_1.gif

6F09A 63A 8 26 09D 71 1 5
bartl is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2013, 01:52 AM   #41 (permalink)
I won a special award
 
Maxum96's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Northern Colorado
Posts: 5,999
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bartl View Post
I'd rather fill all mine with Helium to make the car lighter and get better gas mileage....

I heard the German cars have an option for hydrogen filled tires.
__________________
1970 Fastback (to be finished outside as a Boss 302 clone)
393 Windsor AFR 205 heads with 11.5:1 compression
Tremec TKO 5 Speed
Link to my Hub Garage and blog about my car http://www.hubgarage.com/mygarage/maxum96





Maxum96 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2013, 10:40 AM   #42 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 17,296
Crazy

Quote:
Originally Posted by bartl View Post
I'd rather fill all mine with Helium to make the car lighter and get better gas mileage....
Helium in front tires, water in rears would help even out weight distribution!

Putting Di Hydrogen Monoxide in the rear tires could be hazardous. Since it's hydrogen and oxygen they could explode!
slim is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Vintage Mustang Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.2

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2 ©2009, Crawlability, Inc.