Front Suspension Support Tool? - Page 3 - Vintage Mustang Forums

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post #31 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by glmarker View Post
I read the article and found it clearly explains why my right front shock looks like the one in the pictures below.)
I'm noticing the bushing split on the top of one side, but the bottom of the other. I would take that as some credible evidence too.

68' Fastback 302 GT, 350hp,T5z, some mod's
Near total rebuild began 12/08 AND NOT DONE YET
Archer, S5 E7: "Don't you have a tractor pull to go headline?"
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post #32 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 01:03 PM
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25 years of classic Mustang ownership and I've never once heard of this kind of thing. Crazy
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post #33 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 01:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glmarker View Post
I read the article and found it clearly explains why my right front shock looks like the one in the pictures below.)
Going to ask, what shock brand are they? As well as the original pic from the article? I don't think I've ever seen a front Mustang shock with an upper dust shield. They have always been a shock with the chrome shaft on the upper end. Perhaps a more "universal" part that isn't quite correct....

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post #34 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 01:20 PM
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From the 69 Manual. I too have never heard of or seen this particular tool. So it seems you are supposed to make your own ? Brian
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post #35 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 01:22 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by BlakeTX View Post
25 years of classic Mustang ownership and I've never once heard of this kind of thing. Crazy
I can't match your (or some others here) experience, but I have spent countless hours in the past eight or so years trying to learn all I can about these cars. I already said I've never heard of this either but there it is, and Bob Perkins is someone who would know (even if you discount Heasley). We have now learned others here were aware of it too.

68' Fastback 302 GT, 350hp,T5z, some mod's
Near total rebuild began 12/08 AND NOT DONE YET
Archer, S5 E7: "Don't you have a tractor pull to go headline?"
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post #36 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 01:23 PM
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It seems to me that the real benefit of that tool would be where you are removing the ball joints, spindle, or lower control arm, and want to avoid the additional time/labor of compressing/removing the coil spring above the upper control arm.

url]http://i87.photobucket.com/albums/k156/jefftepper/IMG_0027_edited-1.jpg[/url]

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post #37 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 01:26 PM
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Why would you be driving your Mustang at night in a bad neighborhood to start with?. LOL
Well if you're me...


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post #38 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 01:30 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Brian Conway View Post
From the 69 Manual. I too have never heard of or seen this particular tool. So it seems you are supposed to make your own ? Brian
I'm not convinced one way or the other just yet. Bart suggests a block of wood (like my brain for example), but if I decide to follow the factory advisement I'll probably get my welder out. Steel I have on the shelf.

68' Fastback 302 GT, 350hp,T5z, some mod's
Near total rebuild began 12/08 AND NOT DONE YET
Archer, S5 E7: "Don't you have a tractor pull to go headline?"
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post #39 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by glmarker View Post
I read the article and found it clearly explains why my right front shock looks like the one in the pictures below.)
No. Your shock looks like that because it's too old. Old rubber gets hard and dies. It has nothing to do with wheel hang.

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Originally Posted by gregb View Post
I'm saying I didn't see that picture in the post. However, look at that shock, that rubber looks pretty old as well as the shock body. I would have said it was already on it's way out rather than blame the suspension drop. That and the crappier materials stuff seems to made of nowadays.
^^^^^^ yes.

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Originally Posted by JeffTepper View Post
It seems to me that the real benefit of that tool would be where you are removing the ball joints, spindle, or lower control arm, and want to avoid the additional time/labor of compressing/removing the coil spring above the upper control arm.
Like others, I use the wood block method when I'm removing the shock, ( for those times when I haven't already removed the shock the sensible way; i.e. when the wheels are on the ground & the weight of the car keeps it from extending all the way). A block of wood under UCA does a nice job of keeping the wheel droop from extending the shock all the way. Like GT289 pointed out some time ago, the shock, if it has stock dimensions, will extend fully and limit the wheels from hanging low enough to cause any damage.

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Why would you be driving your Mustang at night in a bad neighborhood to start with?. LOL
Because I live in the "bad neighborhood", homie.

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post #40 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 02:29 PM Thread Starter
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Like GT289 pointed out some time ago, the shock, if it has stock dimensions, will extend fully and limit the wheels from hanging low enough to cause any damage.
But you see Z, that's just it. When the shock is extended to its limit the spring just keeps on with great pressure. Guess where that pressure will be focused most? That's right, on the weakest point possible, the top of the frickin' shock's bushing (along with the strut bushings, reportedly too). From the article; "....with multiple unsupported lifts, the damage grows worse."
Even as dumb as I am this makes fair sense to me.

68' Fastback 302 GT, 350hp,T5z, some mod's
Near total rebuild began 12/08 AND NOT DONE YET
Archer, S5 E7: "Don't you have a tractor pull to go headline?"
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post #41 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 02:34 PM
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I'm not convinced one way or the other just yet. Bart suggests a block of wood (like my brain for example), but if I decide to follow the factory advisement I'll probably get my welder out. Steel I have on the shelf.
I'm just finishing some front end work and I think I'm now a believer in the suspension tool if it's going to be in the air for any length of time.

The pic of the old shock below looks like the one from 4ocious. Not sure if that's "normal" but I know this car has spent a lot of time on stands through the years.

The other two shots are of the new Bilstein shocks I just installed. The car is on stands and I used a jack to take the weight off the right side shock. The left is hanging.

You can see the obvious rubber bushing distortion on the left side.

If nothing else, it may just protect my shock investment a little longer!?!?



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post #42 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by 4ocious View Post
I'm not convinced one way or the other just yet. Bart suggests a block of wood (like my brain for example), but if I decide to follow the factory advisement I'll probably get my welder out. Steel I have on the shelf.
No need for a welder....this works just as well.


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post #43 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 02:46 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Woodchuck View Post
No need for a welder....this works just as well.

Well, that's a wrenching turn of events.

68' Fastback 302 GT, 350hp,T5z, some mod's
Near total rebuild began 12/08 AND NOT DONE YET
Archer, S5 E7: "Don't you have a tractor pull to go headline?"

Last edited by 4ocious; 02-12-2017 at 02:48 PM.
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post #44 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 03:03 PM
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No doubt in my mind, the pressure of the spring pushing opposite of the top of the shock is pretty darn great. But, I tend to think how many lifting cycles, without the the wheels being supported, would it take for the damage to take it's toll and be seen? I'm quite sure the front shocks have been rotated out any number of times, thus, would mask any impending damage by virtue of being replaced. I never once thought about the shock's top being pulled apart.
In my life time of mustang ownership, (since 1967) except for when I had an alignment, it has always been lifted using a contact style lift.

Now, when I was working on specifics of either side, I did use a tool, such as FORD recommended to trap the "A"arm.
But, maybe we all should these days since the quality of any of our parts has declined with the movement to off shore.
This is how I see it......

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post #45 of 50 (permalink) Old 02-12-2017, 03:04 PM
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There's isn't much force left in the spring at the point where the shock is all the way extended. Sorry, the shock bushings aren't going to give out until they are old and hard. It has nothing to do with the suspension hanging down.

The article you have faith in is just so much BS. The conclusions they arrive at are only supported by focusing on a narrow issue, while ignoring the effects of age on the shock bushings, that's not acceptable science methodology. Any undergrad science major could pick apart the article's reasoning. You can't just pick and choose some forces at work on the shock bushings, and ignore other major causality. That's not scientific reasoning, it's entertainment.

There have been several postings on this topic, combined that relate years of letting the wheels hang down, without any issues with the shock bushings. That alone should alert you to the fact that there are more valid reasons for bushing failure than "wheel hang".

Z
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