cowl repair without welding - Vintage Mustang Forums

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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
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cowl repair without welding

66 with almost no rust elsewhere but the watering can tells me the RS cowl leaks (water in the floor mat). It's not a torrent so I don't think it's Swiss cheese, but still.....

The problem: I don't have any welding skills. Nada.
I can take off the fender and get to it, but then what?
After reading lots of threads here on the issue I noticed a reference to "plastic top hats" from NPD but a search on their site doesn't turn anything up...unless I missed it entirely.

It rains a little here in western Oregon so this is a problem I should probably deal with. And I can't afford the $$$ to take it to a shop to do a job like this.
So is there any cheap fix that doesn't involve welding??
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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 12:32 PM
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IMO, they do nothing to stop the rust, maybe just buy you some time.

But here is what I think you are looking for:

http://www.cjponyparts.com/cowl-vent...5-1968/p/CVRK/

Rusty

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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 12:40 PM
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It really depends on the damage. If it's just the vent damn causing the leak then this will band aid it. I'm not a fan though. The only way to tell what is wrong is minor surgery at least. I replaced the whole cowl on my '67 and I'm sure glad I did.

http://www.cjponyparts.com/cowl-vent...All%20Products

This is the cheap way out. But does involve some welding....
https://video.search.yahoo.com/searc...3a&action=view



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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 03:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pathwayrev View Post
66 with almost no rust elsewhere but the watering can tells me the RS cowl leaks (water in the floor mat). It's not a torrent so I don't think it's Swiss cheese, but still.....

The problem: I don't have any welding skills. Nada.
I can take off the fender and get to it, but then what?
After reading lots of threads here on the issue I noticed a reference to "plastic top hats" from NPD but a search on their site doesn't turn anything up...unless I missed it entirely.

It rains a little here in western Oregon so this is a problem I should probably deal with. And I can't afford the $$$ to take it to a shop to do a job like this.
So is there any cheap fix that doesn't involve welding??

Get a used welder and get busy. Any type of patch job won't be anything more than a very short term bandaid.

I have seen external screw on covers though.

Wife,........."You drove how far for that thing?"
Daughter,..."Theres no inside and it stinks."
Friend,......."Dude, thats a rusted pile."
Son,.........."This old car is cool."

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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 03:45 PM
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Don't waste your time or the next owners time on a Mickey Mouse band aid fix.

Half of the work I end up doing on my classic cars is just undoing a previous owner's "repair"

Get a welder and do it RIGHT.
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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 03:49 PM
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There any number of autobody adhesives that are very useable in non-stressed applications. They may be your alternative. However, why not purchase a MIG and start learning. Your current project will not be your last that requires a welding skill. You can seek out a local trade school or welding shop that, for a small donation, will give you a couple lessons. I took night lessons at a local welding supply and repair shop.
Good Luck....
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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 04:12 PM
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Even though it rains less in western OR, believe it or not, your car will continue to rust. No matter how much sealer, epoxy, or axle grease you lather up on the rusty top hats, the cowl area is still going to be singing that great Neil Young song,

"Rust NEVER Sleeps".


Z

PS. A through examination always revels the rust to be more extensive than you thought it was. Always. If it's not Swiss cheese yet, it's paper thin with a thin paint coating.
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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 04:43 PM
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If you just want to keep the water out you could try one of these until you can fix it right.
http://www.cjponyparts.com/scott-dra...SABEgLvmvD_BwE
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File Type: jpg cowl-vent-cover.jpg (34.0 KB, 17 views)
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 04:47 PM Thread Starter
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That looks like a good temporary fix. Can I assume this also blocks the air that would otherwise get blown by the heater fan?
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 04:50 PM
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Yes it will block the air coming in also. You could just put it on when it rains and when parked. It's not that attractive but it will work.
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post #11 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 04:56 PM
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Yep, no easy fix here............
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Ken ..
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post #12 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 04:58 PM
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Is there anything like that cowel repair kit for a 70. The only rest mine has is around the vent.
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post #13 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 05:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Israel View Post
Get a used welder and get busy. Any type of patch job won't be anything more than a very short term bandaid.

I have seen external screw on covers though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lennyB View Post
If you just want to keep the water out you could try one of these until you can fix it right.
http://www.cjponyparts.com/scott-dra...SABEgLvmvD_BwE

That's what I was describing.

Wife,........."You drove how far for that thing?"
Daughter,..."Theres no inside and it stinks."
Friend,......."Dude, thats a rusted pile."
Son,.........."This old car is cool."

USMC Security Forces, Kamiseya Japan, 0311

Build Thread: http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/vi...sted-pile.html
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post #14 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 05:11 PM
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Quote:
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That looks like a good temporary fix. Can I assume this also blocks the air that would otherwise get blown by the heater fan?
The ends of the cowling plate have exit holes that allow water to drain out so they naturally allow air in as well. The holes are relatively small though so the heater/fan may not run well on high speed.

331 solid flat cam, rings and bearings break in run up.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MNjb-AiWec

331 break in complete and is waiting on me to finish the body work
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhnOk5FCBkE

One of the last tnt's on my 289 may she rest in pieces. It ran in the
high 11's low 12's when it was at its best.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2yWPZGfMT0
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post #15 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-18-2017, 06:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zray View Post
the cowl area is still going to be singing that great Neil Young song,

"Rust NEVER Sleeps".
wheres the beef I mean the video ?

supershifter2 < !
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