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Old 12-20-2004, 12:38 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Sac69 came over today to help me on the final paint touch ups on the 70. He also brought over his new headers so that we could do a little modification work on them with a die grinder and cutoff wheel. We got all involved in the paint aspects and I forgot to work on the headers - blame it on paint fumes. haha. The job went smoothly and Sac69 saved me from myself a few times when I overlooked an area or two that was supposed to recieve primer.

The car is in my garage and the temp in there was 50 degrees! Had two halogen lights working to try to heat the air a little bit. It was kind of ghetto, but I popped the dryer door open, jammed the safety switch in the "door closed" position with a mop handle, then set the dryer on high and let er rip. It helped a little since the car is about 4 feet from the dryer door.

Anyway, we got it all masked off and shot a couple coats of DPLF epoxy primer over the body filler and over a few spots of bare metal. I was going to finish the job tonight, but after waiting 90 minutes per PPG instructions, the paint was balling up on the sandpaper. Guess it takes a little longer than what works at 70 degrees. I have a thermometer in the garage, I checked and it was reading 48 at that time! yikes. The PPG base coat/clear coat can be shot at 50 or above, so that the evening temp. put the end to that idea. Was probably smart not to work late anyway. I put another thick coat over the body filler on the door an called it a night. Spraying was a little different since I backed over my "buddy tank" with the car the other week. I broke off the coupler, so know I am reduced to using just the air compressor and it's internal tank. There is no regulator on that so instead of 55 psi out to the hose to the paint gun, it was putting out 110 psi. Guess I should fix the coupler before painting the base coat/clear coat. I was using the touch up gun, so did not worry too much about air supply (the tank, not the music group).

Well, there you have it. The bad karma was successfully lifted by the kindness of a fellow VMF'er. Now if I can only remember to fix his headers . . .

Guess I'll be painting the car Christmas day.
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Old 12-20-2004, 05:50 AM   #2 (permalink)
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DPLF isn't meant to be sanded, only a sealer.
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Old 12-20-2004, 08:14 AM   #3 (permalink)
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woke up this morning to snow, windy as hell and a steady 12 degrees...think I'll crawl back into bed and wait for spring
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Old 12-20-2004, 09:03 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Hehe --- fun with paint fumes!

Sounds as though you're making progress.
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Old 12-20-2004, 09:50 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Do you think the dryer could start a flash fire
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Old 12-20-2004, 12:31 PM   #6 (permalink)
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That is exactly what I was thinking when I read his post about propping open the dryer and lighting it off. Whenever I do anything solvent related (painting, cleaning parts, etc...) I unplug the dryer and the washer, shut off the water heater pilot. I don't want anything to create an open flame with fumes in the air. :horror:
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Old 12-20-2004, 01:58 PM   #7 (permalink)
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PPG's DPLF is a VOC compliant successor to their DP. Both products are an epoxy primer with self-etching properties claimed by PPG, although others debate the self-etching ability of these products.

The PPG tech sheet on this product describes it as a primer. The tech sheet states that ALTERNATIVELY, the product can be thinned and used as a sealer. PPG sells a different product specifically manufactured as a sealer. I've used a system of, successively, DPLF epoxy primer, NCX 280 primer surfacer, PPG sealer (forget the product code), DBU base coat, 2002 clear coat (all products from the PPG line of products).

For body fillers I use all-metal or metal-to-metal when repairing immediately after working the body dollies to smooth out a dent or pound down a high spot, followed by Evercoat brand fillers - standard lightweight filler followed by a polyester glaze type filler to fill pinholes and laydown a microfine, smooth working surface.

The DPLF can be sprayed and either base coat or NCP 270/280/285 primer surfacer can be painted over it any time up to one week from application of the DPLF - per the PPG spec sheet. If the DPLF is left uncoated longer than one week, it is to be sanded, a new coat of DPLF applied, then it can be painted over with base coat/primer surfacers.

Basically, any PPG primer can be sanded, although my PPG dealer says dry sand, not wet sand. One of the beauties of the primer is that runs, sags, drips, and debris can be sanded out. I've actually block sanded over the DPLF, prior to laying down filler, then more DPLF, then primer surfacer, then more block sanding, filling etc. I've used the DPLF as a sealer and I've also used PPG's specifically formulated sealer.

I have to reluctantly and respectfully disagree with your characterization of DPLF as a sealer and not a primer, and the conclusion that it is not to be sanded. On the other hand, perhaps I misunderstood your parenthetical. Thanks for your comments and support.
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Old 12-20-2004, 02:03 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I thought about that. The dryer is an electric drying, which helps a little bit. I had the window in the back garage door open with a box fan mounted up to the window, blowing out. I was spot painting 6 areas about the size of a 50 cent piece, plus half the driver's door, with an HVLP gun. Yeah, it could be dangerous to try painting major areas of the car with the dryer running. I guess I am being more desparate than smart here. The DPLF has a lower VOC than the base coat or clear coat, so it does not flash off as much meaning it is less flamible. I would not try the dryer trick painting base coat and clear coat.
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Old 12-21-2004, 11:41 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Never paint when shop temp is below 70 degrees and that means the metal to. When painting in home shops be careful of any ignition source such as shop lights,house fans,water heaters, wall sockets and even static electricity. Lets face it most home shops are small and it won't take mush to blow the roof off.
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