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Old 01-11-2008, 04:01 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Anyone willing to share their best headlight upgrade story with me?
I have a 70 that the lights just don't cut it any more. Wiring or some other mods are ok with me.
Thanks
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Old 01-11-2008, 04:28 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I went the simple way; just a new headlight switch and sealed halogens. Lots has been posted here about using relays to get full voltage to the bulbs, which is good if you have wiring problems, but I didn't find it necessary. The difference is amazing. Oncoming traffic flashes me thinking I have the brights on when they aren't. I put the new switch in for insurance. Been several years and it is all still just fine.
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Old 01-11-2008, 05:13 PM   #3 (permalink)
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what is a relay, what would it do, and how would you wire it?Im trying to gain a little electrc knowledge since I keep heereing about relays to attach headlights and fog lights and parking lamps as running lamps.
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Old 01-11-2008, 05:33 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carlosmaurixio
what is a relay, what would it do, and how would you wire it?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relay
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Old 01-11-2008, 07:32 PM   #5 (permalink)
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yeah I read half way through that earlier, but ended up more confused... just trying to learn the basic function in a headlight setup.
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Old 01-11-2008, 07:50 PM   #6 (permalink)
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A relay in essence, let's you bypass all of the wiring going to and fro and "essentially" give you a nice fat connection directly to the battery.

Wire has resistance, the smaller and longer the wire the more. Resistance = less current. Less current = dimmer lights.

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Old 01-11-2008, 08:00 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Its all clear now... so the switch controls the relay and the relay sits between the lights and the battery. Thanks.

To wire in the relay: could I use the wiring that goes from the HL switch to the HL to control the relay? And simply add a line that goes from battery to relay to HL? Or am I simplyfying too much?
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Old 01-11-2008, 08:08 PM   #8 (permalink)
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nope, you nailed it
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Old 01-11-2008, 08:19 PM   #9 (permalink)
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GREAT! for those of you who've done it, what relays would I need to wire the front HL and the rear stop lights? Those look pretty DIM and could cause an accident. Do I just go into radio shack and ask for a 12V relay or are there more complicated specs? Also would an inline fuse be a good idea between batt. and relay?

On the rear, I dont think LED's are for me and Im already planning to paint the inside shell white, I've heard it works, but perhaps an additional relay would be even better.
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Old 01-11-2008, 08:23 PM   #10 (permalink)
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A hotter draw or load by certain types of halogen lights (e.g. foglites or driving lites) requires heavier circuitry hardware (switches, wires, etc.) to hande the extra load. This in itself is not a problem, simply put in the heavier wire and away you go. Picture a grade 10 electrical shop high school task, where you have to construct a basic circuit:

battery (+ side) -> wire-> switch-> wire-> light-> wire going back to-> battery (- side).


Now your existing Mustang headlight circuit is basically this, but on a scale suitable with regular headlights, with some additions like marker lights that we don't need to get into.

Now upgrading your headlights to units with a heavier draw: To visualize this, imagine the better pulling power of a 750 cfm versus a 450 cfm carb, you'd want bigger displacement, better manifolding, lumpier camshaft, bigger valve size, freer exhaust to take advantage of the bigger carb.
So it is with a heavier set of lights, or air horns, or whatever exterior electrical accessory, you reinforce the hardware to take it.
So rebuild your circuit , right? Well, your car already has stock wiring for the headlight circuit. It's silly to rewire the whole circuit with upgraded wiring. So how to reconcile the need for heavier wiring with the stock wiring we have?
Solution: add a relay.
The relay uses the above high school example, but after the new heavier wire you install leaves the Batt + side or other switched on pwer source, a "left turn" is inserted instead of the switch in the high school example. This "left turn" is called a relay, and to one of its four or five terminals (both are common) you attach a normal car gauge (14 or 16 gauge is fine IIRC) trigger wire, and it runs from the relay to whatever you wish to use to turn on your new lights. It can be connected to another circuit (parking lights if you wish) or a new switch you put in the dash, or whatever source you wish to use that when it is turned on it will tell the headlights to go on also. This is called a trigger circuit. You then run a light gauge wire back from this trigger switch back to the relay, one of the terminals on the relay will be for this return wire.
In the high school example above, this all functions as the switch, but does so using the lighter gauge, existing car wiring you have in your Mustang. You install the heavier gauge (12 is good) wire for the rest of the high school example - that is, your new lights. The rest of the relay terminals - one (or possibly two, on a five prong relay) go to the lights directly. all using the new haevier gauge wire, and the remaining terminal goes to a good ground like the frame or negative terminal of battery.

Two benefits of all this: 1) heavier circuitry will properly run your better lights, with excellent results, and 2) no new heavy or hot currect carrying wire will enter the driver's compartment.

I did all this with a set of Cibie Super Oscar driving lights with 100 watt bulbs on my old VW - I measured those suckers as they lit up the road for 7200 feet- and for 14 years never had an overheated wire or problem or output issue.
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Old 01-11-2008, 09:57 PM   #11 (permalink)
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I assume if you have a '69-70 you'll have to have two relays?
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Old 01-11-2008, 10:05 PM   #12 (permalink)
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AFAICS no, one relay should do the job if you wish to install one. One relay will do both headlights, no other circuit is really affected, unless you are specifically referring to the 4 headlight system on the 69.
FWIW, I am NOT running a separate headlight relay on my stock 67 GT, and I've got Cibie H4 headlights installed and they do a great job as they are. Have had this setup in the car since 1971, no problems have ever been experienced and have good voltage at lights.
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Old 01-11-2008, 10:08 PM   #13 (permalink)
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My personal plan is IPF housings and Sylvania Silverstar H4 bulbs with a relay harness. We did something very similar in my buddy's truck and I'm a believer, it's like turning on daylight.
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Old 01-11-2008, 10:10 PM   #14 (permalink)
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My mistake, I was asking about the four lights of my '69..
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Old 01-12-2008, 03:09 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Would a relay kit like this work?
Any one have a source for a relay kit?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eB...201218873&rd=1
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