Oil for a Rebuilt engine - Vintage Mustang Forums

 
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 12:44 PM Thread Starter
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Alert Oil for a Rebuilt engine

I purchased an 1970 mustang with a rebuilt engine on it. The guy told me to put Syntetic oil but the Quicklube guy told me to put 20w50.
What should I do about it?
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 01:23 PM
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Ignore the Quicklube guy! If the engine is broken in, which it probably is, I would also recommend synthetic. But it's kind of a personal preference thing. As we often say here, motor oil is like religion!

Whichever oil you run, 5W-30 would be my recommendation. 20W-50 would be for a racing engine built with very "loose" tolerances, for an older engine that's pretty worn out, or for driving across the Nevada desert at 100MPH in August.

For a freshly built engine, you need 5W-30 so the oil can get where it needs to be and do its job.

Lots of people assume what the racers run on the track is also best for the street. This is not the case.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 02:48 PM
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you may need a ZDDP additive
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 02:51 PM
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generally, the kids at Drippy Lube don't know what the hell they're talking about

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 02:51 PM
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Keep in mind that quick lube guys tend to be bottom rung, the guy might have been working at McDonald's last week. You can find knowledgeable people at such places but for close to minimum wage pay it's not likely.
Synthetic is a personal preference. If you like the car enough to not mind spending extra for synthetic then use it. My personal preference on vintage engines is to use a slightly higher viscosity, 10W-30. Especially in the south. 20W-50 is more suitable for racing or an engine that has a whole bunch of miles on it.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GypsyR View Post
Synthetic is a personal preference. If you like the car enough to not mind spending extra for synthetic then use it. My personal preference on vintage engines is to use a slightly higher viscosity, 10W-30. Especially in the south. 20W-50 is more suitable for racing or an engine that has a whole bunch of miles on it.
Well said. I used synthetic for years and I think it was overkill on a street car, especially a fair-weather cruiser. I save my money and change the "dino" oil more frequently instead. I also use 10W30, I think 20W50 is too heavy. Factory owner's manual does call for 30 weight after all.

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Last edited by rumble; 08-17-2012 at 03:14 PM. Reason: wording change
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 03:22 PM
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use 10w30 non synthetic valvoline racing oil and some zddp additive.

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by GypsyR View Post
My personal preference on vintage engines is to use a slightly higher viscosity, 10W-30. Especially in the south. 20W-50 is more suitable for racing or an engine that has a whole bunch of miles on it.
FYI, 10W-30 is effectively the same viscosity as 5W-30. The "5" means it will protect the engine like a 5-weight oil in a cold weather startup. The "10" means it will protect the engine like a 10-weight oil in cold weather. Both will provide the protection of a 30-weight oil at operating temperature. But you're right, in the South, a 10W-30 is fine. Here in Colorado, where I live, I like to have the extra protection of the 5-weight for cold starts when it's below zero degrees.

One advantage to the 10W-30 is the additives will last longer than the 5W-30. It takes more additives to create the wider spread. And the more additives required, the shorter the life of the additives. For any car enthusiast, this isn't typically relevant as we tend to change the oil long before the additives are shot.

Last edited by Klutch; 08-17-2012 at 03:42 PM.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 07:29 PM
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As I vaguely recall from a conversation with a very knowlegeable technical rep from Pennzoil some time back he said about the same thing about the viscosity spread. Simple rule of thumb, less spread the better.
I live a state and a half north of the OP and they don't know the meaning of zero degrees around here.
BTW, 20W-50 happens to be the factory recommended "thin" winter oil for my old motorcycle. :0
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 07:50 PM
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To start with, all oil today is a synthetic base, so it is really one of personal opinion if you want or have the desire to buy/spend $ for "full" synthetic. For a break-in oil, check with your machinist or local supplier as syn in a "new" engine really slows down the ability of the rings to fully seat....delays up to 1000 miles and typically you can locate a straight weight oil (30w) which will meet your initial requirements. After the initial break-in period (typically 300-500 miles), unless otherwise stipulated, i would run a 0-30w or 5-30w oil, that should suffice for most climates up to 100 degrees....and yes, after break-in, add 1 botle of ZDDP to the oil.
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 08:21 PM
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"you may need a ZDDP additive"

+1000 !!

Basically, The EPA has screwed up everything...

Only two brands that I would even trust today are Valvoline, and Royal Purple... Nothing else... Just because it may say "Synthetic"...means absolutely nothing today....like it did years ago. Oil is completely different today than it was even two years ago..

You need an oil with ZDDP.. Valvoline Racing oil and Royal Purple have it.

No others do..

As far as I am concerned, All the others suck.. Stay away from them.

What you can do is buy ZDDP additives, and add them everytime you change the oil, and just use regular engine oil.. Royal Purple, and Don Garlits of Drag racing fame sell ZDDP additves, and I highly recommend them if you are using off the shelf engine oil... This is what the EPA has done to the basic car owner.
Without ZDDP, You will wear out your CAM and other engine parts bigtime....especially if you have a performance engine. Your typical car owner and guy behind the counter at the autoparts store are totally oblivious to this...and probably will not know what you are talking about and think you're from MARS if you bring up the subject..

I used to be a die-hard Pennzoil and Castrol user... Not anymore since all of this BS happened with the EPA intervening into Store Brand engine oil..



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Last edited by NEFaurora; 08-17-2012 at 08:33 PM.
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