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Old 11-26-2012, 10:44 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Need some important info

Is it really that hard to take a head off. Do you have to heat the bolts. This all started with breaking 3bolts on the exhaust manifold and now it up to 800 bucks. Take the head off - 200. Might as well do a valve job - 250. Manifold 190. Machine work 200. Gaskets. What's your opinion.
Mike
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Old 11-26-2012, 11:06 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Is it really that hard to take a head off. Do you have to heat the bolts. This all started with breaking 3bolts on the exhaust manifold and now it up to 800 bucks. Take the head off - 200. Might as well do a valve job - 250. Manifold 190. Machine work 200. Gaskets. What's your opinion.
Mike
Once you have the exhaust manifold, fuel and water connections, throttle linkage, etc. removed, it's just a matter of removing the head bolts (no heating required) and voila. As a retired ASE Master Tech, I'd safely say that to remove the head bolts on a 200-I6 would take me about 3 minutes with my impact wrench.
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Old 11-26-2012, 11:27 PM   #3 (permalink)
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After that I was going to have the bolts drill out. Would I have the bottom machined
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Old 11-26-2012, 11:31 PM   #4 (permalink)
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After that I was going to have the bolts drill out. Would I have the bottom machined
Iron heads aren't as prone to warping as aluminum. A competent machinist can lay a straight edge along the surface to check and see if it's flat. Same thing can be done to the block. Chances are it just needs to be cleaned up with a whiz wheel (3M surface prep discs on a die-grinder).
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Old 11-27-2012, 12:07 AM   #5 (permalink)
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I'm guessing the $800 price is you dropping the car off at a shop and then driving it home when they are done. Not out of line to me.
For a DIY'er, it's way off. Removing a cylinder head from a vintage Ford isn't rocket science. Neither really is reassembling it. The average DIY type would pull the head and drop it off at a machine shop. Instructions would be for a "valve job" as needed, remove the broken bolts and repair the threads if necessary, and check the the head for flatness, taking a flycut off it if needed.
Reinstall with a new gasket set. The only "special" tool required would be a torque wrench. Most parts chain stores have a tool lending program for those if you choose not to invest in one. Common wrenches and a socket set will about do the rest.
You can't put a price on the satisfaction of having done it yourself.
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Old 11-27-2012, 07:34 AM   #6 (permalink)
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I'm guessing the $800 price is you dropping the car off at a shop and then driving it home when they are done. Not out of line to me.
For a DIY'er, it's way off. Removing a cylinder head from a vintage Ford isn't rocket science. Neither really is reassembling it. The average DIY type would pull the head and drop it off at a machine shop. Instructions would be for a "valve job" as needed, remove the broken bolts and repair the threads if necessary, and check the the head for flatness, taking a flycut off it if needed.
Reinstall with a new gasket set. The only "special" tool required would be a torque wrench. Most parts chain stores have a tool lending program for those if you choose not to invest in one. Common wrenches and a socket set will about do the rest.
You can't put a price on the satisfaction of having done it yourself.
This is what I am going to do. I didn't buy this car to pay someone else to do it. I like learning about it. I actually have 2 torque wrenches.
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Mike
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:26 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I replaced both of mine back in the early 80's with nothing more than a Tom Monroe book and basic hand tools to use. I didnt get my power tools until yrs later

but then again I was 23 full of gusto and attitude. couldnt say id want to do it again now without air tools.

you do have the while youre at it factor, so nows the time for a head rebuilt with hardened valve seats, maybe new valve train, if not already done recently;timing chain, water pump,
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:42 AM   #8 (permalink)
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This is only a straight 6 so it should be easy. I have the air tools also. I'm 58 and have lost some gusto but I think I can do it.
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Old 11-27-2012, 03:05 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Enlist a helper or be lazy, I mean CAREFUL, and use an engine hoist to actually lift the head off the engine. For what it is it's not all THAT heavy but you to lean way over the car and lift it out. Not good for non-23 year old backs.
At one time I bolted two chains as loops to a straight six head at each end. Me and helper pulled the head up a bit and turned it 90 degrees. With each of us using a chain loop as a handhold we then lifted the head and walked to the front of the car. Worked really well. Went back in the same way. Note, don't try this with an early Jaguar V12 head, a Cummins head, or any obnoxiously heavy heads like that. Use a cherry picker or a hoist. I have removed a Ford 300 six head by myself with no hoist. I can promise you I won't be doing that again.
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