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Old 11-30-2012, 09:47 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Increase in value

Curious to know if anyone has an idea how much a 1966 Mustang coupe has increased in value during the past 10 years. TIA
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Old 11-30-2012, 10:00 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Well, I don't think this is a "one size fits all" answer. It depends on the car. The rare cars (like the K-code coupes) have certainly increased a lot more than the lesser-optioned cars.
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Old 11-30-2012, 10:27 AM   #3 (permalink)
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27%



Seriously, that is one of those questions that really doesn't have an answer other than "It depends...".

Consider the provenance, factory options, condition, location, general economy relative to collector car prices, how badly the seller needs to sell, and how badly the buyer "Needs" that car. Lastly, how likely is it that one of these cars has remained frozen in time (unchanged) for a decade?
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Old 11-30-2012, 10:31 AM   #4 (permalink)
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The collector market tends to swing big with the economy. The hobby market trends too, but without the big swings. I would say you could find close to the same prices ten years ago as today, for a plain Jane coupe.
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Old 11-30-2012, 10:46 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GT350R Klone View Post
The collector market tends to swing big with the economy. The hobby market trends too, but without the big swings. I would say you could find close to the same prices ten years ago as today, for a plain Jane coupe.
Fine....being a FB owner, you're probably a bit biased Hahahahaha
Just for fun, someone give me a swag for one like mine. It's a full body off restoration done in 1985. I do know that I bought a very nice coupe in 1992 for $3500.00. Similar ones sell for around $9000.00 today.

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Old 11-30-2012, 10:58 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Only way to know the 'value' of your car is the sell it, get the cash in hand and count it. Until then, it's all guess work. Value guides are junk. The economy makes things weird. I've seen nicely restored coupes in my market around $9-10k depending on options, but I've also seen people asking $5k for a basket case. Doesn't mean it's worth it. I've gotten a hoot out of watching some verts sit on the market for over a year now. some of them wanted like $4k for them when they were mostly a rotten shell. I offered him $1k after seeing it. He emailed me back last week if I'd go with $1500 (mind you, after a year). Told him my offer has since gone down to $500. We'll see what he says, but bottom line, values aren't set until the transaction is done.

Verts and FB's will always command more than similarly equipped/conditioned coupes. Just the way it is. When you get into restomods, the market gets really odd because then you have to find someone with the same taste as you.

I guess, I don't watch the value of my mustang anymore. Does me no good. It's not like I'm going to sell it.
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Old 11-30-2012, 11:01 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Probably about 50% of the time,labor,and parts you put into it. Not a convert, K code, or fastback or any other exotic variation you may have, its a "plain jane" as GT 350 put it.
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Old 11-30-2012, 11:53 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imnezrider View Post
Fine....being a FB owner, you're probably a bit biased Hahahahaha
Just for fun, someone give me a swag for one like mine. It's a full body off restoration done in 1985. I do know that I bought a very nice coupe in 1992 for $3500.00. Similar ones sell for around $9000.00 today.

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In the 90s (1990-1999 almost all "investments" were increasing wildly in "value". I retired in 2000. The 2000s are known by investors as a lost 10 years. Stocks, houses and most other investments went no where or down during that 10 year period...employment as you know is still in the tank! My often wrong guess is that during a down period leading to an almost depression the mid range collector car market is less than brisk!


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Old 11-30-2012, 02:03 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I'd have to agree with those saying very little growth in last 10 years. I bought a 1966 Convertible, 200 with standard interior needing floors, rear frame rails and quarters but otherwise mechanically sound in 1996. In 2011 I bought a 66 Coupe, 289 with Pony interior, needing floors, doors and quarters but otherwise mechanically sound for only $600 more. Granted, I may have overpaid slightly in 1996 for the convertible, but I still think it's a sign that not much has changed.
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Old 11-30-2012, 04:49 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I'd say they have not kept pace with inflation. A good coupe has always been around ten grand for quite a while now.
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Old 11-30-2012, 04:55 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Usually, used cars are not much of an investment. If you are very familiar with a supply and a market you can occasionally capitalize on a match between high demand and low cost. I have owned my 67 since 1985 and while it has reportedly appreciated, the value of that money in my business or proper stock holding would have far exceeded the increase in value of my car even given exaggerated asking prices.

As a general rule if asked: to your wife it is an investment, to a federal agency it was a loss.
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Old 11-30-2012, 06:46 PM   #12 (permalink)
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The last 10 years have been basically 0. They haven't been good for most collector cars. You can look at the Barrett-Jackson and other auctions. You have three scams in a row, Savings and Loan, DotCom, Housing. All get rich quick scams. Now you have one of the slowest recovery ever.

Not a good time to sell, pretty fair time to buy. Too many people concerned about their jobs and general outlook is concerning. Times like this people hold off on things that aren't needed.

Also, you'll see a rise when Hollywood decides to make another movie with a classic car in it.
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:53 PM   #13 (permalink)
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I beg to differ.

In 2000 I was looking for a toy.
I could have bought a Maserati Ghibli or a Ferrari 330GT for about 40k in #3 condition.
That was beyond my pocket book.
I bought a Sunbeam Tiger for 20k.
Today the Sunbeam is a 40k car.
Those model Maserati and Ferrari's are 100k cars.
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:14 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Ten years ago the rare shelby's and Boss 429 mustangs were bringing well over 200k and now those same cars are only bringing 150k to 175k so the market has surely came down. However the average mustang that most of us own have probablly gone up slightly in value. A nice coupe was 8k to 10k then and will now cost you some where around 12k. In my opinion assuming your Mustang is exactly as you purchased it 10 years ago it should be worth a couple thousand dollars more than when you bought it ten years ago. I would say if you are the type of person who actually drives your Mustang and have put some miles on it and is now an older restoration with some wear and tear from those years of enjoyment than it is probablly worth about what you paid for it and no more.

If you bought your Mustang for an investment than it was probablly a mistake. If you bought your Mustang because you love cars than you are way ahead of the game.
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:32 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Like most things, the best answer is it's probably worth what you can get someone to pay for it. I got my convertible for $13,500 in 2008 and my coupe for $6800 last year, and I think I probably got both for somewhere between $2500 and $3000 under "market value" just because I found motivated sellers. At the same time, you could probably sell a car for a little bit more than "market value" if you find someone who's dead-set on owning a classic Mustang that's a particular year/color/body type. I offered someone $15,000 for an A-code convertible maybe a month before I bought mine and was turned down, and that car wasn't in as good shape as the one I ended up with. It's probably more in how you shop if you're buying and how you market it if you're selling.
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