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post #27 of (permalink) Old 03-15-2019, 07:25 PM
hsvtoolfool
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Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Rocket City USA
Posts: 610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
$1699 for 12" brakes, $1799 for 13" brakes.
Thanks! I got the rough numbers off your web site, so I must have overlooked these two items or looked at the wrong things. I always round up for a pessimistic cost analysis since the little items we forget tend to add up and blow budgets. For example, I forgot to add $200 for shock tower panels required for the DSE Alumaframe. No doubt there's more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
You are forgetting the 100's of hours labor putting the DSE kit in.
50 hours additional labor is more likely, but even that is rather irrelevant in the big picture. Remember, both my cars are total, ground-up restorations. The cowl repairs, frame rails, and front torque boxes alone will be much more time and trouble.

At least in my case, the additional labor for the DSE kit involves removing the shock towers (30 min via plasma torch and BFH), measure, fit, drill, and weld the steel plates to the frame rails (8 hours), bolt the DSE frame to the rails (1 hour), weld custom shock tower panels (8 hours), and finally add the required frame-rail-to-firewall bracing (8 hours). Double my guesstimates to about 48 hours as a worst case. Supposedly it can be a weekend job if two people really go at it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
We make complete packaged solutions, not sure where you are seeing the piecemeal options.
I was going by what I found on your web site, so I missed the complete front-end package. If you can provide a link that includes suspension, brakes, and steering with all required linkages and fiddly bits included then I would appreciate it VERY much. I realize that each install is unique, but even having "generic" bundles that includes everything is very helpful from a cost-analysis viewpoint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
All day long I sit on the phone talking with customers and helping them plan their build.
Speaking as someone who provides tech support each day to electrical engineers (who you'd think would know how read a manual, use personal computers, and browse the Internet), you have my deepest sympathy, Sir.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
We have all the core components you are going to need from small fittings and gaskets to the big stuff.
Excellent!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
Give me a call if you like, I'll be happy to help you put a compatible plan together.
We'll talk. I've still got some penny scrounging and garage prep to do. But I'm getting closer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Project Creep View Post
If you are doing a Coyote engine in the Detroit Speed AlumaFrame, add another $3k for headers.
What if I fabricate my own headers for both cars just for the challenge and fun? Full stainless kits with flanges, J-bends, and collectors run about $800. Tuck everything right where I need it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stephen_wilson View Post
Just a few thoughts, do you KNOW the geometry is better than a modified stock style suspension?
I never said one was better than the other. The camber/caster curves for the DSE Alumaframe are published (and excellent by the way). I like the C5/6 Corvette spindles for several reasons. They are better than stock 1960s V8 spindles in every regard: weight, strength, smaller pivot distance to wheel mount face which means wider tires fit and have a better scrub radius, and brake options are plentiful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stephen_wilson View Post
A Corvette has substantially different track width, wheelbase, wheel & tire package, and rear suspension to match.
Obviously, the DSE Alumaframe is not a Corvette suspension and only uses spindles similar to the C5/6 design. DSE designed the Alumaframe specifically for 65 to 70 Mustangs and those are the only vehicles it supports. Detroit Speed has a very good reputation and their cars consistently win at national track events. I'm confident they know their stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stephen_wilson View Post
As for the frame stiffness, from what I've seen it doesn't address the weakest part, which is transferring forces from the front rail/apron through the cowl to the rockers.
I was specifically referring to twist between the frame rails themselves. The front frame rails should remain in a flat plane relative to each other. The thick steel cross-members in modern shock-tower-delete kits are a huge improvement over a stock tubular cross-member bar which does very little to prevent twisting. Now look at how wide the DSE frame is front-to-back. Twisting forces are spread across a wider area and the frame rails effectively become one large unit. The DSE Alumaframe design is very good at resisting twist, yet is lighter than a single, large steel beam. Pretty cool.

Obviously, bracing is also required from the frame rails back to the firewall and A-pillars. Browse the Build Forum for example photos of how this is done. Mustangs To Fear even makes a kit. It's not that big of a deal. In fact, it's a good idea to apply this trick for a better handling stock suspension.

Move along. Nothing to see here.
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