67 Fastback GT 390 Full Restoration - Build Thread - Page 2 - Vintage Mustang Forums
 64Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #16 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 11:00 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
7T02S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
Cart and Rotisserie

The next step was to build a roll-around cart. I decided to use a combination of 4x4 and 4x6 and some huge casters. The front casters were salvaged from some military equipment. I borrowed them from a co-worker.


Being able to roll the shell around is such a nice luxury!


The next step in the plan was to get it ready to get dipped. I decided to have the car stripped and electrolysis dipped. Unfortunately, they told me I they couldn't dip the car with any black undercoating since they can't have those chemicals in their tanks. Not what I wanted to hear! Nearly the entire interior and underside were coated in undercoating by a previous owner. I tried many methods but finally had to resort to paint stripper on the interior and physical scraping on the underside.

I did most of the interior before the rotisserie but first I'll show some pictures of the rotisserie that my uncle and his friend built. What a nice piece of equipment!

First though, I needed to make some adapters to attach the rear of the car. I decided to grab into the rear leaf spring holes. Building the adapters involved drilling some holes, getting hardware, welding on some nuts, and welding the assemblies together. My first welding project in years! I was happy with how they turned out.


Attaching the rear:


Front goes on the bumper mount holes:


Wha La!
Grabber70Mach, Caper50 and Wildpat like this.
7T02S is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #17 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 11:16 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
7T02S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
Manual Labor - Stripping and Scraping

Here's the interior AFTER I spent several weeks figuring how to strip it off. I tried scraping both by hand and by power tool. I decided it was just going to gouge the metal. I researched chemical stipper and found a "safer" strip call Citristrip Stripping Gel. Smells like oranges! It's a gel that would cling to vertical surfaces. I could leave it on for a few days and then proceed to scrap off the thick undercoating. It took about four bottles and lots of labor. Not fun! The rotisserie helped me get into the sides since the car was undercoated all the way up the quarterpanels to the headliner.

Before:


After:




Now for the bottom. The rotisserie really helped this part. Fortunately, the undercoating beneath the car was brittle, unlike the interior was, so it didn't need any stripper. It just needed some scrapers from HF. They dulled out pretty quick so I had to sharpen them often.
Before:


After:


The scraping revealed the original primer color underneath was red oxide. This matches what was common at the Metuchen, NJ plant.


Lot's of labor but it was a pretty great way to get very familiar with the condition of the car. Unfortunately, I decided I needed an entire new floorpan.
7T02S is offline  
post #18 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 07:42 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
7T02S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
Stripping Appointment

The next step was to load her up and take her to the stripper. It was about a six month wait for the appointment and I was really glad I called the same month I got the car! The stripper also does an electrolysis dip where they kill the rust by zapping it with electricity.

On to the trailer she goes!


Once at the stripper's, I had to leave her all alone outside in the cold. They promised she was going inside that night...


Here's an image I got while the car was "under." Turns out the car was covered with a skim coat of bondo. My parent's bought the car in 1994 and the car came back from the Philippines in 1986. I'm guessing the car was restored before it came back. That means it rusted away overseas, in two decades, and needed a full paint job including quite a few patch panels here and there. Here you can see the chunks of bondo coming off.


Here it is all ready to load back up again. The bluish streaks are from the phosphorous coating they applied to keep it from flash rusting during the coming metal work stage.


Back onto the wood cart she goes! I attached some casters to a block of wood and bolted it to the sway bar mounts so that I could roll it off the trailer while lifting the rear with my cherry picker. Went pretty smooth!

Last edited by 7T02S; 03-26-2017 at 07:46 PM.
7T02S is offline  
 
post #19 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 07:51 PM
Senior Member
 
Turnall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Dothan, AL
Posts: 4,611
7T, what did the dipping cost?

Allen

My build thread: Allen's Build Thread

My go fast build thread: Go Fast Build Thread
Turnall is online now  
post #20 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 07:58 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
7T02S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
Assessment

Now that the car was bare for the first time in 49 years, it was time to take a look and see what needed to be replaced. Here's the list that I'm replacing:
  1. Entire floor pan
  2. Seat risers
  3. Entire firewall
  4. Both front frame rails
  5. 3 of 4 inner fender panels
  6. Core support
  7. Inner cowl
  8. Roof
  9. Parts of the wheel wells
  10. Lower rear window corners
  11. Rear upper trunk opening corners
  12. Tail light panel
  13. Trunk floor, both sides
  14. Trunk rear support brace
  15. Lower rear quarter panels, inner and outer panels
  16. Lower front quarter panels below vents
  17. Lower part of the fastback vents
  18. Various other patch panels
  19. Both doors
  20. Lower rear of both fenders
  21. Decklid
  22. Hood
That was depressing making that list! Sheesh!



On a good note, the rocker panels, door hinge posts, rear frame rails, structure behind the rear seat, most of the quarters, and most of the wheel wells, are in great shape. That leaves a pretty good exo-skeleton to keep things together while so many parts are taken away.

Last edited by 7T02S; 03-26-2017 at 08:05 PM.
7T02S is offline  
post #21 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 08:02 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
7T02S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnall View Post
7T, what did the dipping cost?

Allen
With the doors and fenders included, I think it came out around $5-6k! Wasn't cheap! They blame the EPA for raising their costs. With nearly a six month waiting list, I think demand plays a larger part: They can charge whatever they want.
7T02S is offline  
post #22 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 08:03 PM
Senior Member
 
drummingrocks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 1,526
Looks like a great start to the project! Your car has a ton of great options--almost makes you wonder if it was ordered as a dealer demonstrator or something along those lines.
7T02S likes this.
drummingrocks is offline  
post #23 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 08:12 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
7T02S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by drummingrocks View Post
Looks like a great start to the project! Your car has a ton of great options--almost makes you wonder if it was ordered as a dealer demonstrator or something along those lines.
Thanks. It's amazing such a car exists since the sticker price was 25% higher than a Shelby GT350! It was even more expensive than the base GT500.

Actually the story we got was it was a Captain in the Navy that ordered it through a dealer in Washington D.C., which matches the dealer address listed on the Marti Report. Apparently he was stationed in the Philippines and had it shipped over on an aircraft carrier. I don't know if that's how it actually got there but it's a fun story, none the less.
7T02S is offline  
post #24 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 08:29 AM
Senior Member
 
Huntingky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Central Kentucky
Posts: 3,081
Nice looking job on those rear brackets. I cheated and cut the ends off the leaf springs and welded them to square tubing.

Coyote build in 65 GT Fastback in body work https://forums.vintage-mustang.com/b...e-powered.html and on Facebook @65gtmustang
F150 SCREW Ecoboost as my daily
66 Emberglow Coupe first car,71 Torino GT, 82 Fastback slooooow 6 banger, 71 Boss 351, 85 GT all long gone
Huntingky is offline  
post #25 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 08:25 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
7T02S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntingky View Post
Nice looking job on those rear brackets. I cheated and cut the ends off the leaf springs and welded them to square tubing.
Thanks.

It's not cheating if it's free and it works!
7T02S is offline  
post #26 of 66 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 09:19 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
7T02S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 48
Chassis Jig

After I decided that I need to tear off the entire front end I decided I needed a chassis jig to keep things square and give me a level measuring plane to weld the new parts back in the correct position. I'm a Mechanical Engineer so I took to my schooling and designed something I thought should do the job. I knew I needed to control four points per side per factory mustang chassis drawings, for a total of eight supports. I designed some trusses and thought a lot about how it would assemble and how it would work with the restoration. Went through many sketches and decided on a design. I then ordered up a bunch of square tubing and went to work in the fabrication bay at work.

I ended up with a bolt together frame work that turned out WAY better than I expected, especially considering my experience welding thin wall steel tubing was lacking. I just considered this needed experience before I jumped onto welding on the actual unibody.

Here is what I came up with after about 60 hours of fabrication over 2 or 3 weekends. The main structure is 1-1/4" x 0.065" wall tubing with 2" x 1/8" wall main supports. The two uprights attach to the front leaf spring mounts and the forward bar with the scissor jack is at the front of the rockers. This allowed me to pivot the car around the leaf spring mounts so I could adjust the front suspension mounts to the proper height off the measurement plane which is the top surface of the trusses.


Here is one of the four perpendicular trusses clamped down to keep it from warping while welding. Overall had to think about the sequence to clamp, tack, and weld to keep from warping.


Since I made most of it from thin wall tubing with bolt together joints, I had to TIG weld in crush sleeves into the holes. The main welds were with MIG. I used 1/2" grade 8 bolts, IIRC, with 5/8" tubing sleeves.


Next step was to get the car on the jig. First was to support the front by jackstands and the back with a cherry picker. Note that the closest side truss had to be placed throught the cherry picker leg prior to lifting. The side trusses were set into place and loosely bolted. Not shown here is setting in the four cross trusses and bolting everything up.


Next was leveling the jig with shims down to the concrete. Once the top surface was generally leveled, tightened all the bolts. Next step was to dial in the shims to get a good level measurement plane on the top surface.


Next I adjusted the scissor jacks to get the car to match the prints on all the suspension and rocker measurements from the factory drawings I found online. One note is that one common drawing online is completely wrong. Once I figured out the right angle, to get the measurement right, I put two more scissor jacks under the front of the front frame rails and welded in some fixed uprights to the rear leaf spring mounts.


In the end, it turned out to be a pretty rigid structure! I can push and prod on the car and nothing shimmies or budges.
Grabber70Mach, drock and image98 like this.
7T02S is offline  
post #27 of 66 (permalink) Old 05-26-2017, 02:07 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 1
Looks awesome! Great job building the jig.
blueoval46 is offline  
post #28 of 66 (permalink) Old 05-27-2017, 10:47 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 752
Nice job on the jig!

Bolting them down to the concrete and pushing/pulling them into square with shims/jacks is a great way to do it.

Only thing I would point out is that sometimes you still need to weasel under the car while its on the jig, to weld from underneath or knock out a dent. Looks like you can still squeeze through an opening and get to the underside though.
roboticservo is offline  
post #29 of 66 (permalink) Old 08-16-2017, 04:34 PM
Senior Member
 
Ryan Miller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Kansas
Posts: 158
Looks good, any updates?

Ryan Miller
Ryan Miller is offline  
post #30 of 66 (permalink) Old 08-17-2017, 10:10 PM
Member
 
stangnet33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 38
What a great start ! Frame jig looks great. Yes also looking forward to any updates.
stangnet33 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Vintage Mustang Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome