1967 mustang welding project - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old Today, 01:29 PM Thread Starter
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1967 mustang welding project

I made a post on here earlier today under a different forum and got helpful responses but was suggested to open one here, i am 17 and fixing my 1967 mustang that i got by trading my Nova, I have to redo most of the weatherstripping and seals and put new floors pans in, the tranny tunnels and the parts where the seats go are all solid but some of the floor pan spots where you put your feet are rotted so i need to weld new ones in, i have a friend that welds but how much would it cost to have a shop weld it? i have the replacement floor pans for a 1967 mustang and i have the interior out of the car, i am not looking for a show car level finish, just a weld that would be structurally sound...with this in mind, would a blind rivet and floor pan adhesive route be worth looking in to? do yall think that a lot of blind rivets paired with pan adhesive would be structurally sound? ill try to add photos later on of my floors
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old Today, 02:11 PM
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How much other work will be required on this car? It may be worth it to find a low cost MIG welder and start learning. Floor pans are an excellent place to start learning to weld sheet metal. Structural integrity, while important, is not as critical as other parts of the car and if you have to redo or just have sloppy welds, they will be out of sight. Have your welder friend get you started and then watch a lot of youtube and read and ask a lot of questions.
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old Today, 02:19 PM
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How much other work will be required on this car? It may be worth it to find a low cost MIG welder and start learning. Floor pans are an excellent place to start learning to weld sheet metal. Structural integrity, while important, is not as critical as other parts of the car and if you have to redo or just have sloppy welds, they will be out of sight. Have your welder friend get you started and then watch a lot of youtube and read and ask a lot of questions.
Stick to welding it, rivets and adhesive will not work and is a bad idea. There are several threads you can find here using the search at the top right for floor pan repair and replacement. Use caution to not cut into any of the supports underneath, hopefully they are in good shape. Drill out the spot welds, you will have to find all of them. Do one at a time and triple check everything before cutting the old floor sections out to make sure your measurements are right. Not sure what a shop would charge you, best to get your friend to help. Like Huntingky said, might even be worth investing in a welder and tools and learn how to do it yourself before paying someone. We like pics and general location in your profile, adding location might even get you local help from another VMF member. Good luck, Jim
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old Today, 03:06 PM Thread Starter
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How much other work will be required on this car? It may be worth it to find a low cost MIG welder and start learning. Floor pans are an excellent place to start learning to weld sheet metal. Structural integrity, while important, is not as critical as other parts of the car and if you have to redo or just have sloppy welds, they will be out of sight. Have your welder friend get you started and then watch a lot of youtube and read and ask a lot of questions.
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Originally Posted by Huntingky View Post
How much other work will be required on this car? It may be worth it to find a low cost MIG welder and start learning. Floor pans are an excellent place to start learning to weld sheet metal. Structural integrity, while important, is not as critical as other parts of the car and if you have to redo or just have sloppy welds, they will be out of sight. Have your welder friend get you started and then watch a lot of youtube and read and ask a lot of questions.
Stick to welding it, rivets and adhesive will not work and is a bad idea. There are several threads you can find here using the search at the top right for floor pan repair and replacement. Use caution to not cut into any of the supports underneath, hopefully they are in good shape. Drill out the spot welds, you will have to find all of them. Do one at a time and triple check everything before cutting the old floor sections out to make sure your measurements are right. Not sure what a shop would charge you, best to get your friend to help. Like Huntingky said, might even be worth investing in a welder and tools and learn how to do it yourself before paying someone. We like pics and general location in your profile, adding location might even get you local help from another VMF member. Good luck, Jim
Thank y’all for your help, I’ll look into welding more, I was just doing research on alternatives and people were saying they had used a combination of panel adhesive and blind rivets and they have the same strength as a weld, if not stronger, and I’d rather be able to do it myself then rely on a friend but I don’t think I’ll be able to learn welding in time since I have limited time before college starts and I’m doing NROTC for the marines during college. There isn’t too much left to do to the car, she is daily driver ready just needs that weatherstrip done and the old floors cut out and new floors put in.
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old Today, 03:12 PM
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Add your location... help could be a few beers and a some burgers away. Jim

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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old Today, 04:12 PM
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old Today, 05:52 PM
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Rivets and adhesive will typically form a good place for water and dirt to collect, and get a really good case of rust started. Structurally, it works; they wouldn't come loose or anything. But for longevity, you'd be a lot better off welding it up right.

Another option if your floor is structurally sound but just has lots of little holes, (and this will surely make some people scream!) is to clean up the rust using something like phosphoric acid, put down a coat of POR-15, and while it's wet, put down some fiberglass or carbon fiber mat. After a couple more coats of POR-15, it becomes 'POR fiberglass' more or less. Under the car, you'll want to clean up as well, and coat the other side with POR-15 and undercoating to make sure that water can't get back in that way either.

Do NOT use regular fiberglass resin for this fix. Nomal fiberglass doesn't have much 'stretch' to it, and because it expands and contracts at a different rate from metal. It will soon come loose and cause problems, allowing moisture back in, and trapping it. POR-15 has a lot more adhesion, and while it's very tough and strong, it does offer just a tiny bit of flexibility, so it expands and contracts with the metal it's stuck to.

You don't have to make the surface smooth, as POR-15 hangs onto a rough surface much better anyway.

As someone with no welding skills or equipment, and being dirt poor, I felt like this was a better option than paying someone else to do a repair that I might not be happy with anyway. While not claiming that this is a perfect factory fix, it's certainly as good or better than many of the hack jobs I've seen where someone cut out the floor and welded new stuff in badly.

I did this to my Cougar, and so far, I'm really happy with how it turned out. If, later on, I discover that my repair was a bad idea, I'm still back to where I was before: I need to cut out my floor pans and put new ones in. From the outside, it's perfect and looks factory stock. Under my carpet, it looks shiny and black. I don't think anyone's going to care except me, ever, and I don't intend to sell the car.

Last edited by Grimbrand; Today at 05:54 PM.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old Today, 07:09 PM
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Post some pic of the damage and we’ll have a much better idea of what methods will work. Also it is highly likely tha5 your cowl is rusted out and leaking. That is what caused the floor to rust in the first place. The bad news is this is a time consuming job to remove the cowl top before you can repair the damage. The good news is that it is mainly just drilling out spot welds, then Mig welding them back up. The actual repair can be anything from using POR as described above to patching the damaged panel to a complete replacement. Te complete replacement is easier than patching but much more expensive for the part.

Te hardest part of the floor repair is getting the new panel to fit well at the tunnel and front edges. The most important things is ensure no water can get in and cause further rust.

Also fill out your profile so we know where you live. There may be a VMfer nearby willing to provide instruction/support

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