heat shrink with solder - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 03:59 AM Thread Starter
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heat shrink with solder

Anyone else try these out? They have a solder inside that can be melted with a heat gun. They're also waterproof. That's 30 lbs hanging what I think is 20 awg wire from an EFI harness.
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 05:39 AM
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I use em and love them.

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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 10:36 AM
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I've never used them, but the idea is sound.

One concern I have is using an alloy that will flow well enough to not cause a brittle/cold joint at a temperature low enough to not damage the heat shrink tubing. Low temp alloys are useful, but are prone to brittleness over time/stress/temp. Still, this type of joint should experience very little mechanical stress.

I would also be very careful as to the wire's condition before inserting it in the connector. Brand new wire usually shows bright copper conductors when stripped back - clean enough to easily "wet" when the solder melts. Older wire often acquires a patina on the copper, even under the insulation. Such oxidation will prevent the flux from wetting the wires for perfect solder connections unless extra flux and sustained heat is used to boil off the oxidation layer.

On new wire, this shouldn't be an issue.

I would use this over a crimp connection in any automotive application.

John
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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 12:17 PM
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I havent used that particular type, but I always use heat shrink tubing when making wiring harnesses...have yet to have any of my heat shrink over solder joints fail...whereas every time I try to use crimp connectors its nothing but issues and ugliness.
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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 12:28 PM
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Gonna have to remember this next time I need to do something with wires. Gotta be better than using electrical tape. I hope heat guns are cheap, cuz I'd have to buy one of those as well.
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 01:14 PM
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Neat idea, probably works fine, but I'd rather roll my own with being able to inspect the solder joint prior to heat shrinking.

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Originally Posted by wicked93gs View Post
I havent used that particular type, but I always use heat shrink tubing when making wiring harnesses...have yet to have any of my heat shrink over solder joints fail...whereas every time I try to use crimp connectors its nothing but issues and ugliness.
Most times I'll strip the plastic off the connectors, put a good crimp on it, solder the connector and then use heat shrink. Looks much better than a xmas tree variety of colors under the hood or dash.

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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 02:23 PM
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Up front I have to say I've never actually used those. I prefer a soldered lineman's splice instead. Mainly because with careful work and the right shrink tubing a repair can be made that is next to invisible. Or at least a lot easier to hide. I can't abide wire splice connections that jump out at you.

Often the knee jerk reaction to these heat gun connectors is fear of a cold solder joint. Apparently it isn't an issue. At some point I might get around to acquiring some of these and testing them. (Think I mentioned doing that before. I am slacking.) One of the tests would be for resistance/voltage drop. Any time you make a connection, you add some resistance, because it's an imperfect world. How much is the issue. Along such lines, GM now has some solder/crimp connectors meant specifically for repair of airbag system wiring. Such systems are extraordinarily sensitive to any added resistance and these new connectors are designed accordingly. I want some but currently you only get them from GM and one other place and they are NOT cheap. I seem to have misplaced the part number but I did already buy a pair of the specified crimping pliers for them.

All that said, in it's proper place, I will use about any type of wire connection. I'm not stuck on any one. Where it will work effectively I will crimp a regular cheap butt connector in a skinny minute.
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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemikiller View Post
Neat idea, probably works fine, but I'd rather roll my own with being able to inspect the solder joint prior to heat shrinking.



Most times I'll strip the plastic off the connectors, put a good crimp on it, solder the connector and then use heat shrink. Looks much better than a xmas tree variety of colors under the hood or dash.
The other problem with crimp connectors is that they are big and ugly, whereas done correctly when soldered and heat shrunk you are hard pressed to find the splice...they also fit far easier into a loom if you have several at the same location(if using a loom)
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 02:37 PM
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Not saying those are bad, there have been a few good points made above, but the last thing I need on a car, especially my old classics that I never have enough time to do the work on the first time, is a problem later on.

For me, if I have to splice a wire, old fashioned solder, good flow, not too hot, followed by quality heat shrink.
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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 04:13 PM
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Cheap Heat Gun

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Originally Posted by DrHawkeye View Post
Gonna have to remember this next time I need to do something with wires. Gotta be better than using electrical tape. I hope heat guns are cheap, cuz I'd have to buy one of those as well.
Heat guns made for electronics work are expensive. However, a dual range heat gun for paint removal is dirt cheap at Harbor Freight. With a 20% off coupon from your favorite car mag, $12.

https://www.harborfreight.com/1500-w...ugg_q=heat+gun
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post #11 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 04:21 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John_Del View Post
,,,,,,,,
I would also be very careful as to the wire's condition before inserting it in the connector. Brand new wire usually shows bright copper conductors when stripped back - clean enough to easily "wet" when the solder melts. Older wire often acquires a patina on the copper, even under the insulation. Such oxidation will prevent the flux from wetting the wires for perfect solder connections unless extra flux and sustained heat is used to boil off the oxidation layer.

On new wire, this shouldn't be an issue.

I would use this over a crimp connection in any automotive application.

John

Nice tip. I didn't know this. Thanks.
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post #12 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 04:52 PM
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I've also seen wires that turn black instead of the Copper green.
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post #13 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 08:14 PM
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post #14 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 08:43 PM
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I bought them and tried them out. They seem to work pretty well. I covered them with regular black heat shrink after words because I prefer the look of the heat shrink.
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post #15 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-15-2019, 08:45 PM
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