My "shop" is finally coming together! - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #1 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 03:03 PM Thread Starter
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My "shop" is finally coming together!

Almost 300 CY of dirt moved. Foundation done, block done, the floor is 5" with two 5'x5' pads with 1/2" rebar +/-7" deep for lift (way overkill for the 9/1000lb lifts I'm looking at).

The size is 28x52. It was 30x50 but after cutting the hill down we ran out of space, I think the extra 2' in length will be more useful.

13' Ceiling.

Few pics along the way:
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2015 Silverado 5.3L 2LT DC Z71
1965 Mustang C Code Coupe 289/T5/3.25
1967 Chevrolet C10 350/700R/3.73
1968 Pontiac Firebird 400

Last edited by 65 Pony; 07-29-2019 at 03:19 PM.
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post #2 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 03:10 PM Thread Starter
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This weekend I almost finished fully grouting the block (completely unnecesssary) after epoxying in rebar in every corner and door jam and every 6-7'.

That was as far as my checkbook could get me. I didn't have the friends or equipment to get this part done in anything under 6 months, this was all done in +/-2 weeks.

I will be building the rest of it, except electrical. I have to have a panel run from the house to the shop (greenville county required licensed electrician) and his fee was reasonable enough to just wire the whole thing. So progress will be much slower now.

The general plan:

I wanted a pass through door. On my current garage, if I open the front and back doors it pulls a nice breeze through, I hope the new shop will do the same.

There will also be a 10'x52' storage/attic space built into the rafters. The ceiling height will only be 6' (I'm 5'8") I wanted the roof line as low as possible for shingling, because I don't like falls. Pitch is a tolerable 6.5/12.




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2011 Mustang 3.7L Premium Pony Package
2015 Silverado 5.3L 2LT DC Z71
1965 Mustang C Code Coupe 289/T5/3.25
1967 Chevrolet C10 350/700R/3.73
1968 Pontiac Firebird 400

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post #3 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 03:18 PM
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Speaking from my own experience with shop, you will need to do something to handle the rain run off and run down the hill on that side of the shop. You have a long roof line on that side. Gutters will help if you get the kind of rain that I do. I didn't expect the problems that has caused me on the uphill side of my shop. I still need to do something better because when we have flooding downpours I get a bit of water inside.



My shop is a truss roof wood frame construction on a slab with all metal on the outside. I neglected to fill in the perimeter where the metal comes down to ground level and it is wavy metal so it can let water in if enough water comes down fast enough.


It looks like you have a good plan. I'm curious why you put down the perimeter blocks or was that also a code requirement?


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post #4 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019, 03:33 PM Thread Starter
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3 reasons.


I like clean siding. The extra elevation helps keep the red clay splash back from staining your siding. Siding stays a lot cleaner. I wanted 13' ceilings. 2"x6"x12' stud walls are going to be expensive enough! And IF there's ever an issue with water, block gets wet, not wood.

Those big green pipes sticking up are for roof drains and eventually a french drain along the side. they tie into my line to my current garage and go to the front ditch.

I've been at my property for 10 years, We've gotten some serious rain. Almost hurricane rain. I've never seen water sheet flow off my neighbors yard into mine, it pitches towards the rear. It's rained heavily here a few times since it's been open and have yet to see any standing water. Also, there's been almost zero erosion off that hill. The garage floor is currently +/-5" above grade. After I finish grass/mulch it should still be 2-3"

I've also spent a few years as a concrete/dirt geotch engineer, tested probably a hundred+ foundations. The cut soil under my foundation/slab is some of THE HARDEST dirt I've ever tested. The grader was getting pissed because the mini cat they brought was having trouble digging through it.

Trusses and windows have been ordered, they're +/- 3 weeks out. By the time I get the walls, roof, and sheeting up, it should be september. I have NO plans to shingle this thing in August unless we get a freak cool down. Mid Sept through Oct is good shingling weather down here.

It's going to match the house I just finished (all the trim work is done now) I spent 6 months of weekend on a bucket truck doing all that (new soffit, new tin, sealed all windows and doors - all new too, wrapped house, and new siding) I also releveled the porch ceiling and did a true bead board ceiling:
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2011 Mustang 3.7L Premium Pony Package
2015 Silverado 5.3L 2LT DC Z71
1965 Mustang C Code Coupe 289/T5/3.25
1967 Chevrolet C10 350/700R/3.73
1968 Pontiac Firebird 400

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post #5 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 10:40 PM
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For some reason I thought your lot butted up against another at the rear, subdivision style. Now I can see that open area you are trying to score. Best of luck with that. Seriously, I would be doing all I could to grab on to that much adjoining land.
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post #6 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 11:21 PM
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ITS NOT BIG ENOUGH!

Ive pondered using blocks in that way in the future. Not sure if it would save a dime over the longer wood but you'd get extra height from whatever stud length, extra insurance from water and bugs/rodents as well.
I just got done replacing a couple or rows of "never rot" Dutch lap siding for my sister, all from nothing more than rain water splashing up over ~20 years.

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post #7 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 11:54 PM
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Iím glad I splurged and installed 2 skylights in my 25x26 shop.
You might also look at insulated garage doors .

Just my 2 cent suggestions

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post #8 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-31-2019, 08:38 AM
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Looks good though an odd construction tecnique but your using the block to make up height is a good idea. Block is never used in residential here unless it was in the 1940s. I would have formed it and just done a concrete stub wall.

What are you planning for HVAC? I threw a 2 ton window unit in my shop when we moved in. I plan to expand the shop if we don't move quickly enough and I will probably go with a package unit. Air filtration is much better and it's all outside.

I see lots of windows. That will massivly limit the usable wall space for tool boxes benches etc. I am not a fan of windows in a shop. Up high they are ok if facing north. Here it's unbearably hot 10 months of the year and you want to limit holes in walls with no insulation that let radiation pass through....
Houses here are typically built with 3x5 and 3x6 windows on every wall. So you have no wall space for furniture or beds...


We have looked at houses between Greenville and Charlotte. The area around Gaffney fits the distance from CLT the best for us. LOML is a Flight attendant so she has to be within an hour or so from the airport. She can't reliably commute from GSP because it's only eagle flights. The weather is measurably better there than here (I check daily) but it's getting harder to get her to want to move... I absolutely unequivocally hate living in TX because the weather is horrible. Im done with the low of 80* 95* at midnight and 100-as high as 117* in the day with humidity...
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post #9 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-31-2019, 10:09 AM
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Nice shop The extra length will be helpful. In my current shop I'm at 36' by 60 with 16' ceilings with a 12' and 14' roll up door on one end. In my next shop I'll have the bays on the "long side" versus end to avoid playing Tetris with vehicles. I built a mezzanine in the end that 12' deep. All my work benches and tools are under the mezzanine. I did R-38 in the lid and R-19 in the walls with insulated doors. It's worked out very well all in all. I think you're going to be very happy with your new shop.

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post #10 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-31-2019, 10:14 AM
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Looking really good. Couple of suggestions you may want to think about adding a dedicated compressor room. I just did, got tired of hearing the loud compressor running and giving me a headache. I also did three foot block walls, then brought the siding down over the block like you plan on doing. Felt this gave me some protection from grinding Sparks and welding while working on cars, so that a stray spark, slag, etc., had less opportunity to come in contact with the wood. Also OSB on the interior walls is a lot easier to mount things on and more durable. You can paint it just like drywall, it was also cheaper.
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post #11 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-31-2019, 10:24 AM
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Curiosity question as I may be moving next year and would probably need to expand (or build) the garage: Why did you build a separate building rather than expand the garage you have? Iíve always liked an attached garage for two reasons: easy of entry (no weather) and security.
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post #12 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-31-2019, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by GypsyR View Post
For some reason I thought your lot butted up against another at the rear, subdivision style. Now I can see that open area you are trying to score. Best of luck with that. Seriously, I would be doing all I could to grab on to that much adjoining land.

What you're seeing behind me is a 30' no build gas line easement, crossed diagonally with a 75' no build electric easement, AND a large detention pond for the professional park development (they all look like expensive brick houses - dentist offices and such). They're supposed to keep the pond maintained, but it has 10+ year old trees growing in it. The land I want to buy is on the other side of the house, 0.7 more acres, currently wooded. Technically, my only neighbor is the guy on the right side you can see in my pics.


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Originally Posted by 1ofAMillion+ View Post
ITS NOT BIG ENOUGH!

Ive pondered using blocks in that way in the future. Not sure if it would save a dime over the longer wood but you'd get extra height from whatever stud length, extra insurance from water and bugs/rodents as well.
I just got done replacing a couple or rows of "never rot" Dutch lap siding for my sister, all from nothing more than rain water splashing up over ~20 years.

50x100 wouldn't be big enough either. I was at my limit width wise and was at a point where adding a few more feet in each direction was begining to cost thousands more. It's hard to see, but there's some serious slopes and cut backs in 3 directions. Fill work was also more $$ than cut and I was worried about vibration equipment damaging all the work I've done to my house only 10' away.


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Originally Posted by c6fastback View Post
I’m glad I splurged and installed 2 skylights in my 25x26 shop.
You might also look at insulated garage doors .

Just my 2 cent suggestions
Unfortunately, we get hail every 2-3 years. I've talked to a local door company about thicker doors and hail "prevention" and they recommend their thicker door with the hard cell insulation stuff. No skylights, ceiling will be closed off, there will be a 10x52 room for storage upstairs.

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Originally Posted by elcam84 View Post
Looks good though an odd construction tecnique but your using the block to make up height is a good idea. Block is never used in residential here unless it was in the 1940s. I would have formed it and just done a concrete stub wall.

What are you planning for HVAC? I threw a 2 ton window unit in my shop when we moved in. I plan to expand the shop if we don't move quickly enough and I will probably go with a package unit. Air filtration is much better and it's all outside.

I see lots of windows. That will massivly limit the usable wall space for tool boxes benches etc. I am not a fan of windows in a shop. Up high they are ok if facing north. Here it's unbearably hot 10 months of the year and you want to limit holes in walls with no insulation that let radiation pass through....
Houses here are typically built with 3x5 and 3x6 windows on every wall. So you have no wall space for furniture or beds...


We have looked at houses between Greenville and Charlotte. The area around Gaffney fits the distance from CLT the best for us. LOML is a Flight attendant so she has to be within an hour or so from the airport. She can't reliably commute from GSP because it's only eagle flights. The weather is measurably better there than here (I check daily) but it's getting harder to get her to want to move... I absolutely unequivocally hate living in TX because the weather is horrible. Im done with the low of 80* 95* at midnight and 100-as high as 117* in the day with humidity...
I've seen a lot of buildings constructed that way here My existing garage was built the same, but using brick instead. I wanted brick to match, but it was going to be much more $. I've also seen too many half *** form jobs where the concrete stem walls looked like crap after.

No HVAC. Too big of an area, my power bill is already over $200/mo in the summer and Duke keeps raising our rates. I want windows. The entire garage will be in shade until around 10am every day from adjacent trees, and the wall with 4 windows will be in shade all day, and 2 of the 3 windows on the window/door side will be in shade from the existing garage most of the day. Closed in spaces with artificial light are depressing. I like light. It's only stupid hot here a few weeks a year, I actually like the heat.

I plan on doing a floor to ceiling built in shelf wall between the windows on the right side. The left side will be most open (more room to open doors).

There will be plenty of storage room in the 10x52 upstairs room.

Don't forget, I have another 22x24 garage 10 feet away

2011 Mustang 3.7L Premium Pony Package
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1965 Mustang C Code Coupe 289/T5/3.25
1967 Chevrolet C10 350/700R/3.73
1968 Pontiac Firebird 400

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post #13 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-31-2019, 10:50 AM Thread Starter
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Looking really good. Couple of suggestions you may want to think about adding a dedicated compressor room. I just did, got tired of hearing the loud compressor running and giving me a headache.
It's hard to read in the plan I posted, but I'm doing a closed off insulated room for it under the stairs. I've been reading about how to handle the heat and most people claim using a large light/vent combo and a 1" gap at the door bottom is enough to keep the air moving and cooler. If that's not enough, even a slatted door in a mostly closed off space should keep the noise down a bunch.

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Originally Posted by CJM68GT390 View Post
Curiosity question as I may be moving next year and would probably need to expand (or build) the garage: Why did you build a separate building rather than expand the garage you have? I’ve always liked an attached garage for two reasons: easy of entry (no weather) and security.
Multiple reasons. Aesthetics is the first. I just don't think I could have made it look right. There's also a bonus room above the garage that would complicate things. I believe per code there has to be 2 exits for every room (one door and exterior window), I'd have to do a funky roof or extend out the bonus room, which means adding HVAC, and that roof is stupid steep, NO WAY could I sheet or shingle that. The permit is different, more code, more inspections. It's also hard to see, and doesn't look it, but the new garage is over a foot higher than the existing one, which would have added a lot more expense to excavation. And my current garage has a 10' ceiling, new one will have 13'. Not sure I could have made all that match and look right with the existing house. It probably would have added another 15-20K to my costs.

That doesn't mean it wouldn't make sense in other situations, it just didn't make any to me for mine.

I actually don't like attached garages for old cars/working on stuff. If I do something that doesn't smell great, like welding or even if I leave the car running for just a few minutes to warm up in the winter, the old car stink makes it way into the upstairs bonus room and adjacent laundry room/kitchen. The 2011 mustang and whatever new vehicle we get my wife will go in there. All my old junk is moving over to the shop.

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1967 Chevrolet C10 350/700R/3.73
1968 Pontiac Firebird 400

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post #14 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-31-2019, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Grabber70Mach View Post
Looking really good. Couple of suggestions you may want to think about adding a dedicated compressor room. I just did, got tired of hearing the loud compressor running and giving me a headache. I also did three foot block walls, then brought the siding down over the block like you plan on doing. Felt this gave me some protection from grinding Sparks and welding while working on cars, so that a stray spark, slag, etc., had less opportunity to come in contact with the wood. Also OSB on the interior walls is a lot easier to mount things on and more durable. You can paint it just like drywall, it was also cheaper.
I see you added a bunch to your post... I was trying to think of a way to avoid drywall and mudding. My dad used plywood on his ceiling. I also used 1/4" OSB in my shed, it was pretty cheap too. I was thinking of using the thinnest plywood (3/8?) and running 3" wide pine strips over all the edges, kind of like a caufered ceiling, and paint the whole thing white. That would be more $ than the sheetrock, but would never crack and take 1/3 time to finish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMagoo View Post
Nice shop The extra length will be helpful. In my current shop I'm at 36' by 60 with 16' ceilings with a 12' and 14' roll up door on one end. In my next shop I'll have the bays on the "long side" versus end to avoid playing Tetris with vehicles. I built a mezzanine in the end that 12' deep. All my work benches and tools are under the mezzanine. I did R-38 in the lid and R-19 in the walls with insulated doors. It's worked out very well all in all. I think you're going to be very happy with your new shop.
Wow, now thats a nice size! I would have preferred 5 or 6 "bays" on the long side as well, but I just didn't have the room. That's one reason I have the exit out the back as well.


Thanks for all the comments/suggestions! This has been a long time coming for me. The original plan I drew up when we bought the house over 10 years ago was 28x30

2011 Mustang 3.7L Premium Pony Package
2015 Silverado 5.3L 2LT DC Z71
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1967 Chevrolet C10 350/700R/3.73
1968 Pontiac Firebird 400

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post #15 of 35 (permalink) Old 07-31-2019, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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We have looked at houses between Greenville and Charlotte. The area around Gaffney fits the distance from CLT the best for us. LOML is a Flight attendant so she has to be within an hour or so from the airport. She can't reliably commute from GSP because it's only eagle flights. The weather is measurably better there than here (I check daily) but it's getting harder to get her to want to move... I absolutely unequivocally hate living in TX because the weather is horrible. Im done with the low of 80* 95* at midnight and 100-as high as 117* in the day with humidity...

Ran out of edit time... Greenville keeps making all these damn "top 10 places to live" lists and people won't stop moving here

I moved to Clemson in 1999, graduated, and moved to Greenville in 2004. I lived in the middle of the state (columbia/Lexington) during the summers during my Clemson years. The temps in the summer are at least 8-10* warmer in the summer and it doesn't cool down at night. No thanks, I never want to live there again.

The majority of Greenville county is 800-1200 feet above sea level, that help keeps the temps down a bit. The humidity sucks though. Don't even think about sanding something to bare metal from June through August unless you get it covered with primer/paint in a day or two.

I really like it here. If you can get through July and August the weather the rest of the year is pretty nice. We do get quite a bit of rain, which is a good thing, but it's usually during the fall and spring. Summer is mostly afternoon storms.


Gaffney isn't bad if you don't mind seeing a giant *** in the sky every day

Look into Blacksburg too.

2011 Mustang 3.7L Premium Pony Package
2015 Silverado 5.3L 2LT DC Z71
1965 Mustang C Code Coupe 289/T5/3.25
1967 Chevrolet C10 350/700R/3.73
1968 Pontiac Firebird 400

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