How long will aluminum components last? - Page 2 - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #16 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 09:22 AM
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Two years ago, I rebuilt the 302 in my Mustang that had been built just before I bought it in '94. The Edelbrock aluminum heads looked like new! There was no apparent corrosion visible to the naked eye. Other small parts, like billet fittings, also survived the 20 years with no problem. The aluminum thermostat housing was a different story. It was heavily corroded. I am convinced that the alloy, surface finish and the differences between machined billet and cheap castings all play heavily in the longevity of the part. I run the yellow Prestone and distilled water. Use quality parts and fluids and you should be able to enjoy your car for years without worry!

BTW- We reused the heads in the rebuild!


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post #17 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by creaky View Post
Good point. Cavitation invites what is called "corrosion cavitation" which will erode metals, especially soft metals. Water wetter products will prevent formation of the corrosive gas bubbles that do the damage.
tHIS TYPE OF CORROSION is why Ford ended up using a backing plate behind the water pump. Ever notice all the pock marks on the backing plate. Thats because of cavitation. Early SBFs part of the volute is built into the front cover this made a better pump but cavitation would eat holes in the front cover. Last years of the 302 they duplicated the original style pump with no backing plate.

The issue is that from the factory the cooling system is vacuum filled. Once it is drained and refilled the impeller cavity dosent fill completely only about 2/3 of it. Just look at the impeller cavity and backing plate you will see like a bathtub ring this depicts how far the cavity filled.
This trapped air pocket causes cavitation and isnt good for proper coolant flow through the engine
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post #18 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 01:32 PM
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".....The issue is that from the factory the cooling system is vacuum filled. Once it is drained and refilled the impeller cavity dosent fill completely only about 2/3 of it. Just look at the impeller cavity and backing plate you will see like a bathtub ring this depicts how far the cavity filled. This trapped air pocket causes cavitation and isnt good for proper coolant flow through the engine
^^^^^^^. Yes, seen many of those bathtub rings. One work-a-round for vacuum filling of the cooling system is to jack up the front end of the car (safely and securely) and fill the radiator with the engine running until it gets hot and starts to overflow the open cap. That's the only other way I know of to get the maximum amount of coolant in the engine without a vacuum.


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post #19 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 04:54 PM
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I know of no definitive tests showing the life /corrosion rate of aluminum/copper/brass/cast iron etc. with varying amount
of recommended engine coolant or sometimes used water wetter.

Many cars recommend coolant mixed 50% with water and flushed/changed every 5 years for corrosion protection. Water wetter has claims with no data.

Many forms of corrosion occur faster at higher temp. Many people in southern/moderate climate regions feel just fine (mentally) operating their vehicle on straight or nearly straight water. That anti freeze is also summer and anytime coolant.
It increases the boiling point (the engine has hot areas internally) and corrosion resistance.


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post #20 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 05:10 PM
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We used Nalcool in our Mack diesels, never had a corrosion problem. I am a big fan of Redline products, so I use their water wetter in my personal vehicles.

Test drove a Mustang convertible in '65, bought one this year(2013)...I don't like to rush into things.
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post #21 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 08:57 PM
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Actually antifreeze does not cool as well as straight water.
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post #22 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 09:00 PM
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^^^^^^^. Yes, seen many of those bathtub rings. One work-a-round for vacuum filling of the cooling system is to jack up the front end of the car (safely and securely) and fill the radiator with the engine running until it gets hot and starts to overflow the open cap. That's the only other way I know of to get the maximum amount of coolant in the engine without a vacuum.


Z
I install a bleeder (rad drain fitting) into the impeller cavity as vertical as possible solves the issue.
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post #23 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 10:03 PM
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Actually antifreeze does not cool as well as straight water.
Antifreeze raises the boiling point, increased temperature increases cooling efficiency plus the antifreeze additives reduces corrosion. For everyday passenger vehicle anti freeze/coolant is considered to be worthwhile. In many cases engineering involves compromise/mixing of factors, one of which is cost.


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post #24 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-03-2017, 07:16 AM
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Anti freeze may increase the boiling point of water but it decreases the absorption of heat into the coolant. It dosent increase the boiling point that much compared to the rad caps ability to add pressure.

Learned this long ago from a rad shop in fla own by the same family for like 3 generations back in the early 70s. They made me custom radiators.

Things you should know about coolant | hellafunctional

Have done research on this. Ford even brought Evans in for a meeting on possible use of his product in production. At the time I was setting up several different methods of circulating coolant through engines and was invited to the meeting.

Evans waterless coolant, prevent engine overheating
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post #25 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-03-2017, 09:16 AM
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Another factor we do not like to look at is design life.

I used to be in the design phase for electronic components. For example, the production line I managed started about 100,000 cell phone chips per day, the main "brain" of the cell phone. The expected service life of the chips was 3.6 years. They were designed to operate 6.2 years. Virtually none of the failed parts that were examined failed due to the actual chip dying. Most were phones being smashed, water logged, battery overcharged, etc.

The chips were not designed to last a "long" time, 10, 20, 30 years, as there was no benefit to the majority of the customer customer base. To make it last THAT long, the chips would be FAR more expensive, and 0.001% of the population would still be using it after operational life (Slim's picture was displayed in the design lab). Most of the phones were out of service after 2 years, due to loss, damage, or upgrades. It is not to say the part WILL fail, it is just that it is not DESIGNED to last forever.

There are a LOT Of parts on the Mustang, not just aluminum, that had a relatively short design life. Seat belts, for example, are rated at 17 years. They may look good, the MAY work, or they may fail due just being old in a 40 mile per hour crash.

We can engineer a loaf of bread to last 2 years without any special action on the consumer's part. The loaf of bread will cost $17 each. Most people are content to pay $2 a loaf, knowing that it will fail in 3 weeks or less, since they do not plan to have it sit around longer than 3 weeks.

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post #26 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-03-2017, 09:59 AM
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I just replaced my neighbor's timing cover on his kid's 2006 Taurus 6 cyl. It started dripping coolant on Thu for the first time, fortunately while it was home here in Ia from college in KC! I pulled and replaced the aluminum timing cover as it was completely eaten away around the coolant passages. The car only had 130K on it! Then yesterday he brought over his wife's Caravan which also started leaking coolant. I'll be darned if we didn't find the exact same thing- the timing cover leaking! I guess I know what I'll be doing tonight...

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post #27 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-03-2017, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by gt350sr View Post
I just replaced my neighbor's timing cover on his kid's 2006 Taurus 6 cyl. It started dripping coolant on Thu for the first time, fortunately while it was home here in Ia from college in KC! I pulled and replaced the aluminum timing cover as it was completely eaten away around the coolant passages. The car only had 130K on it! Then yesterday he brought over his wife's Caravan which also started leaking coolant. I'll be darned if we didn't find the exact same thing- the timing cover leaking! I guess I know what I'll be doing tonight...

Instances like this can also be caused by the metallurgy of the material the parts are made from. Cheep munimula is going to be eaten away much easier. Often the case bean counters not engineering compromise durability of components just to save a couple of cents a part.
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