Scary Steering - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 04:26 AM Thread Starter
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Scary Steering

Hi guys,

I just got my 69 driving and its fine, bit rough, but fine. It was a decently powerful 351w in it currently so there are a couple safety concerns I have. First of all, its 4 drum brakes. I spent a while yesterday bleeding them and they're less spongey but still not ideal. Do you think pushing the pads out further would help this?

My main concern currently is the steering. its terrifyingly light so sways across the road. Not entirely sure what to do about this so any suggestions are appreciated - not trying to die any time soon...

It is power steering and it has all fluids at the right level. The car is pretty much new except for a couple things

Thanks
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 05:42 AM
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I had a similar issue with overly sensitive, “twitchy”, steering. Solved it by doing a wheel alignment to the specs below (from Dazecars.com). BTW you can do this alignment yourself.

https://dazecars.com/dazed/suspension101.html#3

*******

Please align to these specs “1967-1970 Mustang, Falcon & Cougar Performance Alignment with or without Shelby drop”.

These specifications are in order of importance.

1. NO more than .25 degrees difference between driver’s side and passenger’s side.

2. +2.0 to +3.5 degrees caster.

3. -.5 to 0 degrees camber. No positive camber, please. There is no problem having a slight variation from driver’s side to passenger’s side to account for the crown in the road.

4. 1/16" to 1/8” toe in

If you run into any problems attaining these specs, please call me (your phone number here).

********

After an alignment, if there are still some issues with the steering this video is a good introduction into what the possible problems might be and how to fix them... (actually, you may want to check this stuff before an alignment)...


Last edited by P-51; 06-17-2019 at 05:51 AM.
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 06:12 AM
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Mine was terrifying above 5 mph until I replaced the inner and outer tie rod ends, then had the steering box rebuilt by CHOCKO. An alignment will also help. Good Luck!

'68 Mustang Hardtop, 302, C4
AKA "Dr. Wolf"

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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 06:46 AM
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It's very hard to find a shop that can do alignment on these old cars (the first problem is that the database on the new computerized alignment machines don't go back that far which puts 90% of aligners into the "zombie zone"). Given your location, you may want to learn how to do your own alignment. Most shops should be able to set toe, which is likely to be the major contributor.
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dobrostang View Post
It's very hard to find a shop that can do alignment on these old cars (the first problem is that the database on the new computerized alignment machines don't go back that far which puts 90% of aligners into the "zombie zone"). Given your location, you may want to learn how to do your own alignment. Most shops should be able to set toe, which is likely to be the major contributor.
I replaced all of my steering/suspension on my 70 last year. I took a copy of my alignment specs to a trusted local shop that I deal with for other vehicles, since I figured they probably didn't have them (They didn't). They did a great job on mine. No more wandering and drives straight with hands off the wheel.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-17-2019, 06:08 PM
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It's often hard to get enough caster dialed in on these too, which really helps with high speed stability, return-to-center and even helps a little by adding camber when in a corner (bracing against the turn, keeping more tread on the ground). Power steering likes a little more than manual, as 'more caster' increases steering effort (which the power steering offsets).

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