Car Overheating, time to upgrade? - Page 2 - Vintage Mustang Forums
 12Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #16 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-26-2019, 07:18 PM
Senior Member
 
myfirstcar66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Auburn University, Alabama
Posts: 1,062
Garage
Filter is good until it actually gets clogged. Gotta check it from time to time. A small leak in my radiator and a sudden unexpected blockage on my top hose filter is what caused mine to overheat on a trip... and I disagree that pure water cools better than a mix. That's why pure water boils earlier than saltwater, etc. Coolant formulas are what they are for a lot of reasons, and keeping the system under pressure also raises the boiling point. I had to finish my trip with pure water, it ran a lot warmer than usual, but when I flushed it and added the coolant to the mix, it cooled right down. I changed the radiator after I got home. If I had a brand new setup with absolutely no water having been in it, I would run one of the waterless coolants.
vegasloki likes this.

'66 Tahoe Turquoise/ Aqua coupe
•289 / 4100 •C4 Auto •Disc Brakes
•Dual Exhaust •Quick Manual Steering
•Rally Pac •Console •Deluxe Belts
•LOTS of Rotunda accessories
...my first car

'66 Emberglo / Parchment deluxe coupe
•289 / 2100 •C4 Auto •Disc Brakes
•Dual Exhaust •Power Steering
•Dealer Air Conditioning •Console

'66 Nightmist / Blue & white deluxe coupe
•289 / 2100 •C4 Auto
•Factory Air Conditioning •Console
WAITING FOR RESTORATION

myfirstcar66 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #17 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-26-2019, 07:18 PM
Member
 
Edbert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 90
TONS of good advice, the knowledge of this forum is a huge asset.

I think a pressure test should be one of the first things to check. I'd also mention the amount of scale/rust/calcium/corrosion buildup that can be found in 50 year old blocks and heads can be surprising. If that is part of your issue it will be hard to overcome with increased circulation or heat dissipation, heat absorption has become your problem.
New2me likes this.

Edbert
1967 Convertible (GTA/GT350 mashup owned since 1988)
http://sylvia1967blog.wordpress.com
2018 Raptor SCAB 802a
Edbert is offline  
post #18 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-26-2019, 07:21 PM
Senior Member
 
Woodchuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Peoples Republic of Vermont
Posts: 32,906
Send a message via Yahoo to Woodchuck
1. Drain cooling system, remove thermostat and reconnect thermostat housing.
2. Flush with fresh tap water.
3. Fill system with tap water and add one bottle of "Shout!" laundry spot remover.
4. Run engine to operating temperature, then continue for 10-15 minutes at fast idle.
5. Drain and flush with fresh tap water.

These steps will remove any petroleum residues from the system.

6. Flush the system using Mercedes-Benz citric acid-based cooling system flush. Repeat as needed until water runs clear. Typically no more than 2 applications are needed.
7. Install new 195*F thermostat.
8. Fill system with coolant mix or, if using a concentrate, dilute only with distilled (NOT filtered or deionized) water.

This is assuming the remainder of your cooling system components are in good condition. If your water pump is leaking, rebuild or replace it. Replace any deteriorated hoses (and belts). If the radiator has "punky" fins, which are corroded or not in good contact with the tubes, recore or replace it.

My recommendations for a "heavy-duty" cooling system for a small block Ford are:
1. Three-row copper and brass radiator equal to the OE specification for "Air Conditioning" applications.
2. Milodon aluminum Performance Water Pump.
3. "RobertShaw" (now made/sold by FlowKooler.
4. Lower radiator hose with anti-suction spring.
5. Heavy-duty THERMAL fan clutch w/OE-style fan.
6. "Air Conditioning" fan shroud.

and the following:

a. Manifold vacuum source for vacuum advance or utilization of DVCV (distributor vacuum control valve) to modulate signal based on coolant temperature.
b. Hot Idle Compensator or electronic throttle "kicker" solenoid to raise idle speed based on ambient temperature (Hot Idle Compensator) or A/C compressor clutch cycling (throttle kicker).

Bart

What, me worry?
- Alfred E. Neuman

Woodchuck is offline  
 
post #19 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-26-2019, 07:29 PM
Senior Member
 
myfirstcar66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Auburn University, Alabama
Posts: 1,062
Garage
And depending on the year, may need to replace a heater control valve. The 65-66 didn't come stock with one but it's not a bad add for a summer driver to cut some heat from the interior. Needs to circulate during the winter tho so the coolant doesn't just sit in the same place in the heater core etc.
myfirstcar66 is offline  
post #20 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-26-2019, 07:32 PM
Senior Member
Supporting Member
 
Groundpounder17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by myfirstcar66 View Post
Filter is good until it actually gets clogged. Gotta check it from time to time. A small leak in my radiator and a sudden unexpected blockage on my top hose filter is what caused mine to overheat on a trip... and I disagree that pure water cools better than a mix. That's why pure water boils earlier than saltwater, etc. Coolant formulas are what they are for a lot of reasons, and keeping the system under pressure also raises the boiling point. I had to finish my trip with pure water, it ran a lot warmer than usual, but when I flushed it and added the coolant to the mix, it cooled right down. I changed the radiator after I got home. If I had a brand new setup with absolutely no water having been in it, I would run one of the waterless coolants.
I hope that’s not what I wrote. If so it’s a typo. I’d never run 100% water unless an emergency. I was saying I’d run the 50/50 mix and wouldn’t waste my time going higher mix of antifreeze or straight antifreeze. Running straight water will have a lower boiling point and is corrosive and will shorten the life of your engine
myfirstcar66 likes this.

67 Fastback S Code, Brittany Blue

Work in progress
Groundpounder17 is offline  
post #21 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-26-2019, 08:44 PM
Senior Member
 
vegasloki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Vegas
Posts: 1,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by myfirstcar66 View Post
and I disagree that pure water cools better than a mix. That's why pure water boils earlier than saltwater, etc. Coolant formulas are what they are for a lot of reasons, and keeping the system under pressure also raises the boiling point.
The boiling points are different but once we hit those in a pressured system we're way into the danger zone in an SBF. The extra 15 degrees offered by the coolant (at 265F) doesn't really buy you anything. The boiling point of the cooling medium is not an effective measure of thermal transfer. The heat transfer property of water is better than glycol coolants by a factor of over 2 times. That's where some of the "water is better than coolant" argument comes from. While that's true as a point of physics in this application coolant may work better than pure water. (doesn't necessarily have to be a glycol coolant) We're talking about heat transfer in a specific application and not as a general principle of the medium. Engines are cooled by convection and it's a complex process with many variables. The properties of whatever cooling medium are only one of the factors. In this app the surface tension of the water during higher duty cycles is one reason it loses its effectiveness compared to cooling additives. Turbulence in the flow could be another.

In terms of practical purposes street cars should be running glycol based anti-freeze. First off many places in the US freeze and water alone or non glycol additives don't offer any protection from freezing. It's readily available, it works and in late model cars the cooling systems are designed to use it. In the Focus I use 50/50 per Ford. In the Mustang I use water and Water Wetter. Even at 110* during the summer with a stock cooling system I'm well within the operating window of a stock 289 doing 70-80 on the freeway.
Groundpounder17 likes this.

67 Hardtop, brought it back to a driver
http://desertratretro.com
vegasloki is online now  
post #22 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-26-2019, 08:52 PM
Senior Member
Supporting Member
 
Groundpounder17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegasloki View Post
The boiling points are different but once we hit those in a pressured system we're way into the danger zone in an SBF. The extra 15 degrees offered by the coolant (at 265F) doesn't really buy you anything. The boiling point of the cooling medium is not an effective measure of thermal transfer. The heat transfer property of water is better than glycol coolants by a factor of over 2 times. That's where some of the "water is better than coolant" argument comes from. While that's true as a point of physics in this application coolant may work better than pure water. (doesn't necessarily have to be a glycol coolant) We're talking about heat transfer in a specific application and not as a general principle of the medium. Engines are cooled by convection and it's a complex process with many variables. The properties of whatever cooling medium are only one of the factors. In this app the surface tension of the water during higher duty cycles is one reason it loses its effectiveness compared to cooling additives. Turbulence in the flow could be another.

In terms of practical purposes street cars should be running glycol based anti-freeze. First off many places in the US freeze and water alone or non glycol additives don't offer any protection from freezing. It's readily available, it works and in late model cars the cooling systems are designed to use it. In the Focus I use 50/50 per Ford. In the Mustang I use water and Water Wetter. Even at 110* during the summer with a stock cooling system I'm well within the operating window of a stock 289 doing 70-80 on the freeway.

I used water wetter in my FJ40 and it’s really good stuff

67 Fastback S Code, Brittany Blue

Work in progress
Groundpounder17 is offline  
post #23 of 23 (permalink) Old 06-26-2019, 09:06 PM
Senior Member
Supporting Member
 
zray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: On the road in NE Oklahoma
Posts: 12,893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Groundpounder17 View Post
I hope that’s not what I wrote. If so it’s a typo. I’d never run 100% water unless an emergency. I was saying I’d ruon the 50/50 mix and wouldn’t waste my time going higher mix of antifreeze or straight antifreeze. Running straight water will have a lower boiling point and is corrosive and will shorten the life of your engine
If one adds a bottle of water wetter to pure diltilled and deoinized water, then then is more than enough lubrication for the water pump and the water wetter has the anti-corrosive properties also. Of course there is no Freeze protection if that is needed. I recently put a bottle of water wetter in my daily driver, an '02 Jaguar XKR, and removed enough 50/50 coolant to lower the antifreeze % to 33%. My peak temperature dropped 6 degrees immediately. I'm now going to take out enough coolant and replace it with enough pure H2O to lower the antifreeze % down to 25%. probably will leave it there. Water has a much better heat transfer ability than 50/50 antifreeze mix. The less antifreeze you can get by with, the better, IMHO. Of course you need to have something like water wetter in the system for lubrication and anticorrosive properties.

Z

zray is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Vintage Mustang Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome