Full Restoration Processes & Procedures - Page 2 - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #16 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 04:21 PM
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Induction heater?

Vapor blaster?

Acetone bath?

From what planet doth thou hail, sir?

Currently working on a 1970 Mach 1 project. See it here: http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/vi...ode-build.html
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post #17 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 04:51 PM Thread Starter
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post #18 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 05:01 PM
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Just remember, The more you take a car apart, The longer it will take you to put it back together!

A '69-'70 Car has pretty much double the interior parts of a '65-'66 car. No lie. Ask me how I know....

)

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post #19 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 05:39 PM
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Label everything that comes off the car - ziplock bags and Sharpie markers are your friends. And keep your phone handy to take lots of pics of assemblies BEFORE you take them apart. Things that seem obvious how they go together now, when you're looking at the assembled component, won't be obvious in 10 years when you're trying to put it back together.

As for restore or replace, it's largely a decision of economics. A quality re-chrome of my bumpers was going to run about $1,000 per bumper, not including any straightening or repair. Nice new reproductions can be had for $140 each - I can replace the bumpers 9x before I'm even close to the cost of re-chroming! My dash knobs and bezels? I tried polishing them on the buffer and a few came out really nice, but a few were pitted and looked old. New repro knobs and bezels were a fraction of the cost of re-chroming the original bezels. Again economics!

Now if you're building a total points concours trailered show queen and money is no object, then by all means R&R the original pieces - you'll have a better car overall when it's done, but you'll have a fortune into it!

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post #20 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 06:30 PM
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Some random thoughts from my years of building and now restoring (or at least refreshing) cars...

A clean, well organized work area is a must. Avoid clutter and storage in the work areas.







Keep old parts neatly organized with a means to know where they are and what condition they are in.







Painstakingly document your progress and tasks left to do. A spreadsheet is a good start but developing software specifically for the task, regardless of the cost is the ticket.







Store your parts in a clean environment protected from the elements. Don't be that guy that stores the parts in your yard.







Your build and tool truck receipts should be kept in a secure location labeled "danger' or "hazard". If other members in the household see them there could be danger.


Much of the front end of a 96 Ranger race pre-runner and rotating assembly of a 4.0 l Ford Cologne V6.






Blue top bins are the small and hardware parts left to go back on the Mustang.




67 Hardtop, brought it back to a driver
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post #21 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 06:48 PM
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Any good resources for just repainting the engine bay?
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post #22 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 10:34 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, Dave. Seeing your tips, I know I am on the right path to Mustang Zen.
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post #23 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 11:18 PM
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Ok, I didn't begin knowing my restoration was going to take 6 years, it just developed that way. So, begin with a bunch of "before" pics and plan to document your plan and goals. It will keep you focused. The rest, is just the grunt work. All the best....keep us posted.

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post #24 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-12-2019, 11:32 PM
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The only thing I'll add in addition to the good advice so far, is in relation to this:


Quote:
Originally Posted by Knapper View Post

At what point do you restore/rebuild parts? Meaning, do I just take everything off, bag and tag, and put it away; leaving the rebuild until I am ready to assemble? Or, do you rebuild items as they come off and then store them until reassembly?

Its probably a personal decision based on your personality, but here is my take on rebuilding -



Do it as the items come, don't wait until you are ready to assemble. There may be a few exceptions (engines being one of them) but I try rebuild as I go. The reason is pretty simple - As you get closer to finally getting done, or the car started, or whatever major milestone you are approaching, its a royal PITA to have to stop and rebuild some rusty, oily, caked-in-dirt "thing-a-ma-jig" every two seconds. Its virtually guaranteed that you'll be heading toward to major assembly and...."oh look, you forgot to rebuild or restore that needed part".....There's few things more frustrating that when you can just about see the light on a build, yet find that you're having to stumble over stuff you forgot to fix, restore and rebuild - especially if you find some of those parts are beyond salvage, and you waste even more time waiting for a new one. For me its also a bit of a downer to have a mountain of rebuild work ahead - I don't mind it in small batches, but when I know I can't even start on A, until I rebuild B, which will require cleaning and upgrading C, that can't really happen because I'd really need to do D, E, and F first......sigh....I end up not bothering, and overall the project just stalls.



So, what works for me, is to rebuild and restore things as they come, and that way I know I'm good with the parts (or have plenty of time to get a new one). I can tackle the rebuilds without feeling like I'm drowning in constant refurbishment, and as a side benefit - you start to see a growing collection of restored parts and pieces, which keeps me a lot more motivated than an ever growing pile of disassembled bits. I also try vary the work where possible, don't let a single area kill your morale.



Regardless of how you do it, good luck, and remember that there will be good days and bad - just keep your eye on that first cruise when the job is complete.



Allan.

Last edited by Treozen; 07-12-2019 at 11:35 PM.
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post #25 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-13-2019, 06:51 AM
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Lots of great tips in this thread. Here’s my very small tip - instead of using a sharpie to write on the plastic baggie, I prefer to write on an index card and put the card inside the ziplock bag. Sharpie can rub off a plastic bag. Plus this way you can reuse the ziplock bag at some later point because it doesn’t have anything written on it.
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post #26 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-13-2019, 07:46 AM
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Someone may already have written it, but never throw anything away before the car is finished and mount any new part on the car before it's gets painted. It will make life so much easier when you open a box with a new part and find it for some reason won't mount or sit right.

Breaking the project into smaller segments that can be finished, may help keeping the enthusiasm through hard times. Climbing a lot of small mountains, instead of one so high you can't see the top. 👍
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post #27 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-13-2019, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonny Boy View Post
Lots of great tips in this thread. Here’s my very small tip - instead of using a sharpie to write on the plastic baggie, I prefer to write on an index card and put the card inside the ziplock bag. Sharpie can rub off a plastic bag. Plus this way you can reuse the ziplock bag at some later point because it doesn’t have anything written on it.
Very true, and use a pencil, not a pen or marker. Ink can and will fade over time whereas pencil will not.

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post #28 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-13-2019, 03:40 PM
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One of the photos on here reminded me of something. Roll around shop carts are very handy for grouping like things together that you will probably need to move around. I have one for spray cans of stuff, one for electrical and air sanders, grinders, angle grinders, cut off tools and so on and I need to get a third one to put all my primers, paint, filters, mixing cups, paint guns, stir sticks, sanding blocks, sandpapers and all that junk in. If I don't have these things at least partially organized I wind up looking all over the shop for stuff. You will want ones that have a deeper tray like in the photo;


or







I have 2 of the red ones and they have been really handy. So handy in fact that one is overflowing now so I need a third one.



I haven't had any difficulty remembering how stuff goes back on but if you have that problem the photos will save you like people have said. I also have a pdf folder full of wiring diagrams that I have collected which are very handy. I have 2 sizes of label type zip loc bags and I label the general use of where every nut, screw and bolt came from and I keep those in a box storage box.



These sorts of storage baskets with clamp on lids will also come in handy for storing stuff like smaller parts, wiring, light bezels, anything that fits and they will protect the parts from mud dobbers if you have those, spiders if you have those and most rust. You can throw a few dessicate packs in these, clamp on the lid and mark on them with a sharpie what is inside. I have half a dozen of these.



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post #29 of 32 (permalink) Old 07-13-2019, 11:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Knapper View Post
I am just starting to tear everything down and can already see things turning to chaos. I am wording how others have approached a full restoration. I have taken to heart the idea of not throwing ANYTHING out until the project is complete. As I am taking things apart, I have been taking a ton of pictures and bagging/tagging everything.


As I take off old rusty parts, I will be trying to restore some of them. For others, I will try to find good used or NOS parts. And ultimately, I will be purchasing aftermarket when the necessity or economics dictate.


I can already see problems arising as the pile of parts coming off is starting to grow and I have started accumulating parts that I figure I am going to eventually be needing. Without a doubt, I will likely end up purchasing somethings twice because I forgot...I have already done this. So, here are some questions...


At what point do you restore/rebuild parts? Meaning, do I just take everything off, bag and tag, and put it away; leaving the rebuild until I am ready to assemble? Or, do you rebuild items as they come off and then store them until reassembly?


I guess the same type of question applies to purchasing parts that can't be restored. Is it better to acquire the replacement parts as they are coming off the car? Or is it better to wait until they are going to be installed?


I am sure all of this probably falls into the "It depends" category, but the experience of others is welcomed. Then the real question is, how do you track all of this? I have started a spreadsheet that includes P/N, casting number, other notes...what else should I include? Since I am just starting my first project, I would be interested to hear what others do through the disassembly stage and welcome any tracking, bookkeeping and spreadsheets suggestions.


Right now my project is marinating in ATF/Acetone, so I have time to start planning things out. Eventually I will move on to Evaporust and the whole project may magically disappear
I used to live in the Twin Cities. I am currently building a 67 Fastback for a friend of mine and he lives in the Twin Cities actually. Shoot me a PM for my contact info and I can offer my suggestions and experience to try an help since I am not that far from you.
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post #30 of 32 (permalink) Old Today, 07:07 AM Thread Starter
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I used to live in the Twin Cities. Shoot me a PM for my contact info and I can offer my suggestions and experience to try an help since I am not that far from you.
Welcome to the forum! Thanks for the offer. I tried to PM you, but it looks like you may need to satisfy some forum req., like number of posts?
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