Interior Door Painting II! Paint Goes On - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 08-11-2019, 02:09 PM Thread Starter
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Interior Door Painting II! Paint Goes On

So this time I am actually painting the doors. Back panels are painted and I’m very happy with how they came out.

Doors are much more difficult of course and this is as clean as I can get it.

Did a test of primer + paint on a few spots last night. Removed it this morning.

Question us: after self etching primer and 2 solid layers of black NPD lacquer paint how long does it take to become solid like the old door? I notice it chips off super easily with fingernails. Test was only on for 12 hours.

The back panels cured solid far more quickly.

This time I’m letting the primer cure for a full day or two before I paint the door itself.
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 08-11-2019, 04:57 PM
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I used the NPD lacquer on mine as well with an epoxy primer. It took a bit for it to fully cure. A few days IIRC. The paint isn't great at impact protection. It seems to chip and scuff pretty easily. At first I thought it might be an incompatibility with the primer so when I did the dash it took it to metal. It doesn't seem to make a difference. The coating can still be delicate and I'm going on the better part of a year. Even though I wish it were more durable the color match is fantastic and the coating goes on well after you acclimate to spraying a rattle can lacquer. I wouldn't hesitate to use it again.

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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 08-11-2019, 09:57 PM Thread Starter
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So basically you're saying it will get a little better after fully curing but will always chip away fairly easily? What about coating it with a spray on clear coat (a less glossy one if there is such a thing)?

The thing that blows my mind is how night and day different the adhesion to the back panel metal pieces is compared to the doors.
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 08-12-2019, 12:32 AM
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I wouldn't use a clear on it but if you do test a patch first. Paint is made to be used in compatible layers. The NPD lacquer failed spectacularly on my original steering wheel that was patched, reshaped and primed. It didn't like the substrate layers and wrinkled up. I didn't find it to be a durable coating compared to other commercial options. The rub is getting that color matched to a more durable paint was more than I was willing to spend on it.

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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 08-12-2019, 12:42 AM
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He's right. Don't use Clear on the inner doors... It's a nightmare waiting to happen. Just use the laquer by itself.

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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 08-12-2019, 07:15 AM
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I got terrific results using this method. Six years on and my doors /interior still looks new and I don't have an issue with chipping.
Start with the Duplicolor self etch primer. This stuff is terrific. it goes on very thin but is extremely durable.
The next step is a little different than most.
Use SEM Color coat in a "close enough" color. Also extremely thin and very tough and durable. Make sure you get everything covered evenly. It works well on metal, plastic and vinyl.
The final step is to very lightly "dust" the panels with the correct color. What you are looking for is just enough paint to wet the surface and give the proper color to the panel, but not so much that you will have trouble with chipping later.
The SEM is very scratch and chip resistant. if you do manage to scratch/chip the top layer of lacquer the layer below usually resists unless the damage is extreme.
Good luck! I hope it turns out well for you.

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Last edited by SpareTime; 08-12-2019 at 07:17 AM.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
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I’ll definitely avoid a clear coat and see how it adheres with two light coats to the primer for the doors. I’ve switched to a black self etching primer from SEM. I used light gray Rustoleum on the back panels and it bonded well but that surface took in and it needed about 3 coats of paint on the primer. It is a much more grooved and rough surface than the doors.
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old Yesterday, 08:28 PM
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Step away from laquer primer, and other laquer products. There is a reason manufacturers and shops stopped using it. It tends to be brittle and not the best durability. If your stuck using rattle cans, most auto paint supply stores sell rattle cans that have a catalyst that is activated when you first use the can so you should be able to find a true epoxy primer in that media. Get all the laquer product cleaned off and prep it with a red scotchbrite and a quality wax and grease remover. The SEM self etch primer is a decent choice also, but if I remember correctly it requires a standard sanding type primer before a basecoat. You can top coat the primer with whatever compatible basecoat you want and find a compatible clear coat that also uses a catalyst hardner. Might want a satin finish on the interior. All those are a bit more money but you can easily get professional results using them.

Last edited by Matter; Yesterday at 08:33 PM.
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old Yesterday, 09:11 PM
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I find the advantage of the laquer on the doors is it goes on thinner and keeps the texture super visible. I used 2 very thin coats of epoxy primer then a few coats of the laquer. When I went to do the kick panels I only had a half a can of the laquer left so I used a "similar" color to get good coverage then a thin top coat of laquer. I like SpareTime's idea of using a more durable color coat then dust with laquer for final color match. I too have noticed the laquer seems soft and in hindsight would have used this method to get a more durable end result.

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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old Yesterday, 09:44 PM
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I find lacquer to be very durable and have never had a problem with it remaining soft. I do tend to spray in thin coats and allow plenty of time between coats. A major advantage to using lacquer is that there is no re-coat window. Additional coats and/or touch-ups can be done anytime and the paint blends perfectly.
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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old Yesterday, 10:01 PM
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Lacquer is VERY HARD, and very thin. This makes it exceptional for painting surfaces with embossed patterns. Properly applied lacquer should not "flake off". If it does, that means it did not adhere properly to the surface to which it was applied. When doing doors, I prime mine first, with a lacquer primer after an application of Picklex20 to treat and etch the metal.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old Today, 06:51 AM
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"There is a reason manufacturers and shops stopped using it."

Yeah, It's called the EPA and it's because of the amount of thinners used in the paint...Now Outlawed in certain states and areas and That's all.

Ford Originally used Acrylic Enamel based paints in the 1960's.

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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Unread Today, 09:05 AM
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Correct that the prep is the most important factor to good adhesion and a thinner paint keeps the integrity of the texture.
Ford used acrylic enamel and General Motors used laquers into the seventies, you look at those laquer cars in the day and custom paints done then also and they were notorious for cracking and crazing. The manufacture's used them because they dry fast and were good for production speed. The fact that laquer gets very hard is the reason it crazes and chips and adhesion is more difficult than other products. I'm not saying it is a horrible product as acrylic laquer was better than nitrocellulose laquer that proceded it, but technology has come a long way and there are so many better products out there. I say all this as I have been painting professionally for over 40 years and used laquer when it was a current product. Not saying it is the worst thing in the world, especially in the world of rattle cans, just saying there are much better products out there. It is still available at auto paint stores but you will never see a professional painter use it unless a customer requests it for specific correctness on a classic car. Laquer paint jobs also had to be buffed after they dried for gloss.
The biggest thing is you don't want to use it over a softer primer as you will end up with a gummie finish or it will wrinkle, so if you choose to use it be sure you use a compatable primer which typically would be a laquer primer or a catalyzed primer.

Last edited by Matter; Today at 09:10 AM.
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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Unread Today, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodchuck View Post
Lacquer is VERY HARD, and very thin. This makes it exceptional for painting surfaces with embossed patterns. Properly applied lacquer should not "flake off". If it does, that means it did not adhere properly to the surface to which it was applied. When doing doors, I prime mine first, with a lacquer primer after an application of Picklex20 to treat and etch the metal.
What lacquer primer do you use?

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