I6 to V8 Engine Swap - Page 3 - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #31 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 04:05 PM
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Since you've got the head off, your engine bay now looks something like this:
67-200-head_off.jpg

As long as the cylinder walls all look ok (especially #3 since that's your problem) leave the engine in the car and climb up underneath.

You don't have to take the big heavy crossmember off, but you do need to remove the sway bar and if you've got them you'll probably want to take the transmission cooling lines loose. Taking the crossmember off might give you a little more room, but the steering linkage is still in the way so it's not going to make much difference. The oil pan just unbolts and you can drop it down and slide it forward and off.

The only thing you have to worry about hitting is the oil pump pickup. It hangs down about where the drain plug is on the pan.
67-oil_pump.jpg

Has anyone mentioned safety goggles? Aside from 50 years worth of dirt and crud you're now going to have oil and transmission fluid just constantly dripping in your face.

At this point you'll have a nice view of the bottom of your engine.
67-engine_bottom.jpg

You can take the nuts off the pistons and pull the bottom cap off keeping track of the bearing and how it was sitting. Then put some old fuel hose on the bolts and shove the piston up by hand if you can and take out the upper part of the bearing. Then just push the piston up and out the top. If the piston gets stuck you can tap it with a wooden handle to help it along. Don't use anything harder than wood though since you don't want to accidentally scratch anything important.
67-piston.jpg

Once you've got the pistons out you can look them over and see how the rings look and the bearings and decide where to go from there. After posting pics here of course.

Re-assembly is reverse of removal (though it will require a piston ring compressor or something similar and a torque wrench in addition to the tools you used to take it apart.)
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post #32 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 04:44 PM
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Always take pics before, during and after disassembly.

If we had pics of your engine and head we could tell you if oil is blowing by the rings.

Before removing the piston, crank the engine 2 revolutions by hand and video the #6 cylinder wall all the way around. That may tell us if there is a problem. If you broke a ring, the cylinder will be scored and new rings alone will not fix that.

Watch some videos on removing pistons, you may need a ridge reamer.


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post #33 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by jaredlgoldman View Post
Guys, there is a lot to learn as a newbie to car work. I have been doing this for 2 years now. I understand that I have a straight 6 and know the difference. I am a little overwhelmed by the thought of rebuilding an engine or doing a swap. I have been coming to this forum for advice for the past two years and appreciate all the insight you guys have. That is why I keep coming back. If there was a mustang engine school, I would be the first one to sign up and attend. Each project I do, I am learning the terminology and workings of the car.
Again, thank you for the insight and bear with me on using the wrong names for parts.
thanks
All of these projects seem overwhelming at first. But do your research, gets books, watch videos and keep asking questions. I’ve taken on task I never thought I could or would attempt. None have proven too tough once you have the proper tools and knowledge.

That said, an engine swap is pretty darn easy, especially on a straight 6. Much easier than rebuilding it yourself. Disconnect some wires and hoses. Unbolt a bunch of stuff and hoist it right out. An easy weekend job.

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post #34 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 09:32 PM
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I have never heard a big block referred to as a “large” block before.
Doh... Big Block.......That’s what happens when you write posts without adequate sleep.....
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post #35 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 11:34 AM
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Second choice would be a mild V8 transplant, and here is where I will have to soundly disagree with some of the advice given. A full conversion to 5 lug etc. is NOT mandatory.
I'm on the same page, but I think some clarification is needed for owners of 1965/66 I6 cars who might be reading this thread.

All base line 1967 and later cars have the same front spindles and an 8" rear end. Obviously, the hi-po cars got upgrades, but that's irrelevant to this topic. So besides new springs front and rear, there's not a lot to "convert" when swapping a 1967 or later car from an I6 to a mild V8.

The 1966 and earlier I6 cars are another matter...

Since the 1980s, I've heard many horror stories about the weak 64 through 66 I6 spindles failing while driving and eventually being recalled by Ford. To this day, I'm not a fan of daily drivers using those original I6 spindles. Don't even get me started on people still driving around with the original single-reservoir master cylinders!

I also know from personal (scary) experiences how badly those tiny 9" 4-lug drums stink. Once you hit 50+ mph, you better think way ahead when it comes time to stop.

Finally, the 7.25" rear end the 65/66 I6 manual cars got is just truly awful. Dumping a true 200 lb/ft of torque into that weak rear end will likely just spin the rear tire, but the rear end will break eventually. How and when it breaks can get ugly. Maybe you'll get lucky and just snap an axle, but locking up a rear diff at highway speeds is bad.

Move along. Nothing to see here.
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post #36 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 01:16 PM
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I shopped on CL for months and converted my 67 4 lug to 5 lug drum for under $400. That was all new brakes, rubber lines, rear bearings and seals. I reused the front drums but replaced the bearings. Everything inside the drums was new. New hardline on the 8in. 6 cyl driveshaft and u-joint bolted right up to the 8in. I didnt open the pumpkin, but did replace the fluid.

Someday discs will go up front, the drums stop the car just fine, the six has a lot less nose weight as well, so that helps.


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post #37 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by hsvtoolfool View Post
All base line 1967 and later cars have the same front spindles and an 8" rear end. Obviously, the hi-po cars got upgrades, but that's irrelevant to this topic. So besides new springs front and rear, there's not a lot to "convert" when swapping a 1967 or later car from an I6 to a mild V8.
? My '67 had a 7.25" 4 lug rear in it and spindles I tossed in favor of meatier '70's.. You might be thinking of the later cars with the larger 250 CI six in them which came with five lug setups. Those are certainly a lot easier to swap a V8 into than a 200 CI car.
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post #38 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 02:45 PM
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One thing to consider...it literally takes 2 hours to pull the I6 the first time if you have never done it before. The 200CI sixes can be found all day long for $300 or so...you could have that one swapped out within a day and be back on the road while you take your time to collect the V8 swap parts...if you even feel you still need the v8. I have an unused good running 200CI six in the back myself and would even give it away to someone local if they needed it...I am sure you would find people local to you willing to part with one for very little.
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post #39 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 02:49 PM
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It probably refers to it in the video, but if you can feel a ridge at the top of the cylinder with your finger go to the local big box auto parts store and get a ridge reamer from their "loan a tool" program and remove the ridge before trying to pop the piston out or you may end up damaging the cylinder wall beyond repair.
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post #40 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 03:55 PM
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? My '67 had a 7.25" 4 lug rear in it and spindles I tossed in favor of meatier '70's.. You might be thinking of the later cars with the larger 250 CI six in them which came with five lug setups. Those are certainly a lot easier to swap a V8 into than a 200 CI car.
65-66 V8-All spindles are the same
67 I6 And V8-All spindles are the same as 65-66 V8
68-69 Drum spindles are the same as 65-66 V8.

For all the above applications the same C60A spindle was used.

All the above applications can be converted to factory KH disc brakes using Ford parts.

14in wheels will fit under the Ford KH disc brakes.

Most difficult to convert from 4 to 5 lug is 65-66 I6 since a spindle swap and steering components is required.


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post #41 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 04:02 PM
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65-66 V8-All spindles are the same
67 I6 And V8-All spindles are the same as 65-66 V8
68-69 Drum spindles are the same as 65-66 V8.

For all the above applications the same C60A spindle was used.

All the above applications can be converted to factory KH disc brakes using Ford parts.

14in wheels will fit under the Ford KH disc brakes.

Most difficult to convert from 4 to 5 lug is 65-66 I6 since a spindle swap and steering components is required.
But they arent...65-66 spindles have a different steering arm length than 67+, making the later spindles the wrong geometry and causing bumpsteer issues if you use later spindles in earlier cars...you can make them work pretty well with different outer tie rods...but geometry is still wrong
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post #42 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice. I live outside of Boston, MA.

I am looking into finding another I6 motor that I could swap out or Fix the issue that I have now with my engine. For a $300 I can get the head fully rebuild and milled. That might be a good start. Do that work, put the engine back together and see if the problem is solved. If that does not fix the problem, then I can start removing pistons and go deeper into the engine.

If anyone knows of where to find a used inline 6 engine, let me know. I have been all over Craiglist and Ebay with little luck.

thanks
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post #43 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 05:44 PM
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But they arent...65-66 spindles have a different steering arm length than 67+, making the later spindles the wrong geometry and causing bumpsteer issues if you use later spindles in earlier cars...you can make them work pretty well with different outer tie rods...but geometry is still wrong
65-66 V8-All spindles are the same
67 I6 And V8-All spindles are the same as 65-66 V8
68-69 Drum spindles are the same as 65-66 V8.

For all the above applications the same C60A spindle was used.

Pretty simple. Its the same spindle.

Any of these spindles will accept 4 piston KH disc brakes.

68-69 disc spindles are different than drum spindles and different from previous year spindles, but is the same disc spindle for both years.

70 has a different drum and disc spindle that are different than previous years.


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Last edited by bmcgc; 09-11-2019 at 05:49 PM.
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post #44 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 05:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmcgc View Post
65-66 V8-All spindles are the same
67 I6 And V8-All spindles are the same as 65-66 V8
68-69 Drum spindles are the same as 65-66 V8.

For all the above applications the same C60A spindle was used.

Pretty simple. Its the same spindle.

68-69 disc spindles are different than drum spindles and different from previous year spindles, but is the same disc spindle for both years.

70 has a different drum and disc spindle that are different than previous years.
No, they aren't the same spindle. The '65-66 models use a C5DA spindle which is unique to '65 Falcons and '65-66 Mustangs. The C6OA spindle is used on drum brake applications on '66-69 Falcon, Fairlane, Mustang, Comet, Torino, Montego and '67-69 Cougar.

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post #45 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 07:56 PM Thread Starter
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I have a few more questions for you guys. I found a Inline 6 motor on eBay that is not too far away from me. It's not in a car but the guys says it was running.

How do I know if it will fit in my Mustang. The engine on eBay is a 65 Inline 6. My Mustang is a 67 inline 6. Will that work with my transmission ?

What should I be looking for when I go look at this engine. Make sure it's moves freely. Anything else you can recommend to do to see the condition, knowing that it's not in a car right now.

thanks
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