Lowering blocks - Page 3 - Vintage Mustang Forums
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post #31 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-04-2014, 09:23 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stephen_wilson View Post
I'd wait until you get it on the ground to decide. If you only jacked the RF, it will rack the car, taking weight off the RR.
I did jack up both sides up front trying to see how the suspension reacts to movement......this ain't my first rodeo. As a result I cut off one inch from each tie rod (on the r & p) to get toe within some semblance of spec. With the tie rod ends bottomed out, I was looking at 1 inch toe in when measured *at the rotors*. Now there is 1/16 toe out with some adjustment for my alignment guy.

GT289:My experience from several years of building an AX car taught me that weight is a killer. Sprung, unsprung, rotating, what ever.
Karts have no suspension (other than frame flex & what the tires provide). On a race track, they pull considerably more than 1G. Put them on a real life road and they will beat the crap out of you while jumping from pillar to post.......handling suffers. There is more to handling than G forces. Keeping the tires in contact with the ground is an an art form. I haven't got all the answers, but enough to make good judgements.
Your comments on the 1940s suspension reflect something.....but I'm not sure what.
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post #32 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-04-2014, 10:33 AM
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I had a similar experience with my 68. Put on new springs and it was way jacked up in the back. Looked like a redneck ride from the 70s. I was mad as hell, but drove the thing around anyway. After a day of driving the springs settled to the height they are now and I'm happy with that.

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post #33 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-04-2014, 11:07 AM
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IMHO, scrap the lowering blocks idea and either replace or de-arch the spring pack. Adding lowering blocks has the same effect as using a lever (see illustration below). For a practical demonstration, take a standard 1/2" socket and a ratchet from your tool box. Place the socket on a nut or bolt head and try turning it, while placing your fingers on different locations along the ratchet handle. Notice how the farther offset your fingers are from the centerline of the socket the easier it becomes. Now imagine the multiplication of force placed on the leaf spring at the point of contact between the spring and the lowering blocks....
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post #34 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-04-2014, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the input.
Yeah, I get it. Give me a long enough lever & I'll move the world.

That is why I asked about any negative effects of the taller blocks. 1 inchers would be managable, me thinks......dunno about any taller. You are speaking about your real world experience with them, right?

I was concerned more about lateral forces. I don't do drag race. I got over that about 40 years back.

Last edited by JPIII; 08-04-2014 at 11:48 AM.
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post #35 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-04-2014, 12:02 PM
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There aren't really any lateral issues as the axle is trying to SLIDE from side-to-side and not twisting. I have seen and felt the effects of both lowering blocks and extended shackles and can say that I don't like either. An alternative to 1" lowering blocks that has other benefits is to replace your 8 inch tapered tube axle with a 9 inch from an early big-Ford or another 8 inch of similar width with straight tubes (Maverick comes to mind). The difference in tube diameter is worth an inch in height reduction.

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post #36 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-04-2014, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPIII View Post
I did jack up both sides up front trying to see how the suspension reacts to movement......this ain't my first rodeo. As a result I cut off one inch from each tie rod (on the r & p) to get toe within some semblance of spec. With the tie rod ends bottomed out, I was looking at 1 inch toe in when measured *at the rotors*. Now there is 1/16 toe out with some adjustment for my alignment guy.

GT289:My experience from several years of building an AX car taught me that weight is a killer. Sprung, unsprung, rotating, what ever.
Karts have no suspension (other than frame flex & what the tires provide). On a race track, they pull considerably more than 1G. Put them on a real life road and they will beat the crap out of you while jumping from pillar to post.......handling suffers. There is more to handling than G forces. Keeping the tires in contact with the ground is an an art form. I haven't got all the answers, but enough to make good judgements.
Your comments on the 1940s suspension reflect something.....but I'm not sure what.
Karts? You're joking, right? Not even a close comparison. Lateral performance in
a vehicle (with driver) that weighs less than the rear section of a Mustang.....
Yeah. I don't know that I want to waste too much time here. Seems like you've
got it all handled. You're not the only guy on here with copious amounts of track
time or setup experience, BTW.
Have a nice day.

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post #37 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-04-2014, 12:37 PM
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I have the same spring on my car, with 1" lowering blocks and 245/50/16 on the car. Also have the Maier adj panhard bar kit. Car pulls well over 1g and I have never felt any type of ill effects on the handling or braking. And it gets driven hard (built as an AX car that I am slowly pulling back some). I do have a 9" in the car however.

If you have any concerns with the spring itself, contact Mike at Maier Racing. He will make it right. His springs are all US made and are far more consistent spring rate wise than a lot of what is out there these days (from India and China).

G'luck
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post #38 of 38 (permalink) Old 12-06-2017, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by JPIII View Post
1 inch rear lowering blocks seem to be fairly common, but 2 or 3 inch are less so. A pic of the my 65 with the suspension loaded. There is nearly 4 inches, tire lip in back. The front is easily adjustable but the rear is tougher.......3 inches of rake is a bit much. I'd like to get that gap down to around 2 inches.
I read that the new rear leafs will settle a bit but not enough, me thinks.
Are there any detrimental issues with 2 or 3 inch blocks and are they available?

Ive used lowering blocks on over 20 of my ford cars..
NEVER had a problem in 35 years
Yes re-tempered springs is better way to go obviously .
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